Jentz 11e-IM-Ch07 - Chapter7 Title BusLawSeal.eps Creator...

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Chapter 7 Negligence and Strict Liability    See Separate Lecture Outline System I NTRODUCTION This chapter reviews the law concerning the tort of negligence, which, unlike the torts discussed in the preceding chapter, is an unintentional tort.  A part of doing business is the risk of being involved in a lawsuit. An ever-increasing business operating cost is the premium to obtain liability insurance to pay an adverse judgment in a suit.  Many of these suits involve the torts outlined in the previous chapter and this chapter.  In fact, in the United States today, negligence is the dominant cause of action for accidental injuries. This chapter continues with a look at strict liability law, in which intent is not an element. Strict li- ability is an important cause of action on which product liability is based. Product liability is covered in Chapter 23. A DDITIONAL  R ESOURCES A UDIO  & V IDEO  S UPPLEMENTS The following  audio and video supplements  relate to topics discussed in this chapter— 119
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120           INSTRUCTOR’S MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY  BUSINESS LAW,  ELEVENTH EDITION PowerPoint Slides To highlight some of this chapter’s key points, you might use the Lecture Review PowerPoint slides compiled for Chapter 7. Drama of the Law II Video No. 3, entitled “Negligence and Assumption of Risk,” illustrates—in a supermarket setting— how the tort concepts of negligence and assumption of risk apply to everyday life.  See the  Instructor’s Manual  for  The Drama of the Law , pages 19-23 (Script) and pages 24-26 (Teaching Points of Law). C HAPTER  O UTLINE I . Negligence An act that could be an intentional tort if not for a lack of intent may constitute negligence. Under negligence theory, a tortfeasor neither wishes to bring about the consequences of an act nor believes that they will occur but his or her conduct creates a risk of the consequences. The risk must be fore- seeable so that a reasonable person would anticipate it and guard against it, depending on the nature of the  possible  harm.  A very  slight  risk of a dangerous explosion might be unreasonable;  a distinct possibility of burning one’s fingers on a stove might be reasonable. Negligence involves four elements: A duty of care. A breach of the duty. A legally recognizable injury. Causation (the breach must have caused the injury). A. T HE  D UTY   OF  C ARE   AND  I TS  B REACH Negligence involves the careless performance of a legally required duty or the failure to perform a legally required act. Courts consider the nature of the act, the manner in which it is performed, and the nature of the injury in determining whether a duty is breached.
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