Senior paper MTA

Senior paper MTA - SCI-MA-TECH Internship at MTA 11/ 4/...

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SCI-MA-TECH Internship at MTA 11/ 4/ 2005
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The Michigan Technical Academy is where I interned this summer. I chose MTA because of their extreme hands on approach to learning. While there I learned the basics of robotics, applied electrical control; also known as logic, electrical wiring, various sensors, and Programmable Logic Control known as PLC. I also taught for the Robotech robotic summer camp at M-Tech. The MTA program is located in the M-TEC center. The M-Tech center was founded when the governor of Michigan granted $30 million to create statewide technical training centers in 1998. The reason that the governor did this was to prepare high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand jobs for future employees. NMC was one of eight in the state of Michigan to receive funding for an M-TEC Center. NMC received $4.4 million dollars in 1999 for M-TEC. M-TEC is designed to deliver rigorous, relevant training with maximum flexibility. The center will offer one point of entry for business and industry training needs in the areas of manufacturing, construction, aviation and information technologies. Manufacturing Technology Academy is a sub section of M- Tech, consisting of an entire wing of the facility. MTA is a two-year high school program that integrates courses in science, mathematics, economics, and English around the theme of manufacturing. MTA is very much like SCI-MA-TECH with the difference that MTA has a focal point around manufacturing and SCI-MA-TECH is considered a college preparatory program. Mr. Tim Wheatley, Jack Halligan, Debby Oliver, and Wendi Willis all are mentors for the MTA program. 2
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The MTA program is based on a “hands on” approach to learning. The first thing that I learned through this “hands on” approach was the Amatrol Pegasus robot. See picture 1. The Amatrol Pegasus robot is programmed using a teach pendent or through a computer link. The computer programs are written in a language called basic. A sample program looks like figure 1. The robot Pegasus has five basic components. The end effecter (hand), the manipulator (arm), the motor drives, the teach pendant, and the controller. A close up of the five basic components is seen in picture 2. There are three types of robots: reprogrammable, automated, and multitask. Pegasus is considered under the Reprogrammable and automated robot class. Reprogrammable robots can be reprogrammed to perform its task in different ways. 3 Sample Program LABEL 1: PMOVE TP[1] SPEED 150 WAITI 2,1 PMOVE 2 TP[2] WRITEO 3,1 DELAY 100 WRITEO 3,0 BRANCH LABEL1 Figure 1: A sample program written in basic programming language Picture 1: The Amatrol Pegasus robot. Picture 2: A close up of the end effecter (hand) for the Pegasus robot.
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Automated robots can operate without the need of a human to assist it. Multitasking can be programmed to do entirely different tasks such as assembly or machine loading.
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course MATH 101 taught by Professor Walker during the Spring '08 term at Kettering.

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Senior paper MTA - SCI-MA-TECH Internship at MTA 11/ 4/...

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