Wordsworth - 5 February 2006 The World is Too Much with Us...

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5 February 2006 The World is Too Much with Us Wordsworth’s sonnet “The World is Too Much with Us” is a calling for us to return to nature, to leave our material items behind. “Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; / Little we see in Nature that is ours.” “For this, for every thing, we are out of tune.” Wordsworth uses an Italian sonnet structure; fourteen line iambic pentameter. The first seven lines; or the octave, sets up the thesis; “We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!” The eighth line is the thesis of the sonnet; “For this, for everything, we are out of tune.” The six lines following the thesis; or sestet, drive home the thesis, really pound what Wordsworth is trying to say “Great God! I’d rather be/ a pagan suckled in a creed outworn; / So might I, standing on this pleasant lea/ Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn.” “Great God!” Wordsworth is calling out to God for a divine intervention to reverse the trend of materialism. “We have given our hearts away, a sordid
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course MATH 101 taught by Professor Walker during the Spring '08 term at Kettering.

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Wordsworth - 5 February 2006 The World is Too Much with Us...

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