Lecture15_Speciation - Speciation I What is speciation A...

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Speciation I. What is speciation? A. Species = a population or group of populations in which evolutionary forces are acting independently B. Speciation = the evolution of two or more distinct species from a single ancestral species C. Speciation theory New species are created by: • genetic • genetic III. What is a species? Species are easy to define and hard to identify; need to use "species concepts" Name Criterion for identifying species Advantages Disadvantages Biological Species Concept Morphospecies Phylogenetic (or genealogical) species Monophyletic group = a common ancestor and all of its descendants
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An example of the PSC: 1) get morphological or molecular data on homologous traits from 2) if individuals from different populations share most traits (no traits are unique to particular populations), then Asian West African East African Elephants elephants elephants Under Biological Species Concept? Morphospecies Concept? IV. How does speciation occur?
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course BIOL 180 taught by Professor Freeman during the Fall '07 term at University of Washington.

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Lecture15_Speciation - Speciation I What is speciation A...

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