WA#3 - Chapter 8: (1) The five methods of political...

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Chapter 8: (1) The five methods of political participation discussed in the textbook are: lobbying, public relations, litigation, protest, and voting. Lobbying is a strategy by which organized interest seek to influence the passage of legislation by exerting direct pressure on members of the legislature. This is different from the other methods because citizens attempt to determine what those in power will do. Public relations are an effort to sway public opinion on behalf of an issue or cause. This is unlike lobbying because it typically involves employing professional public relations firms to produce print, radio, and television advertising in support of their pieces of legislation. Litigation is a lawsuit or legal proceeding; as a form of political participation, an attempt to seek relief in a court of law. Litigations are different from public relations and lobbying because it uses the courts to achieve a goal. Protesting is generally recognized as a legitimate and important form of political activity and is protected by the First Amendment. Unlike the three previously discussed, protesting involves assembling crowds to confront a government or other official organization. Lastly, the most accessible and most important form of political activity is voting. Moreover, precisely because of the time, energy, and money often required to lobby, litigate, and even demonstrate. (3) A group of citizens can lobby government by writing to the members of Congress to influence their votes or employ professional lobbyists to bring their views to
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WA#3 - Chapter 8: (1) The five methods of political...

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