LA363-Landscape architecture s02 midterm exam - Cal Poly...

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Unformatted text preview: Cal Poly State University, San Luis Obispo, CA College oi" Architecture and Environmental Design landscape Architecture Department LA 363- Recreation & Open Space Planning Winter Qua, zom- Prof. Dfle Sutliff HAMLW__.__. Lidia—rum (100 points) mtg on FALéE (2 pts. each — 30pts.) 1. '1‘ F The greatest past influence in the design of parks in America has been the ' picturesque landscapes of the gardens and early hunting and park grounds of England. 2. T F The town square, or village green, of the American Colonial period was established principally as a recreational space. 3. T F Extending to the public the opportunity of access to what were formerly the private grounds of the European aristocracy formed an initial basis for both European arid American public parks. l 4. T F Philadelphia and Savannah were the first American cities to incorporate formal green space as important components of urban form. 5. T F The right to pursue (have access and opportunity) leisure for all citizens of America was an important value held by America’s first European settlers. 6. T F The view of recreation’s role as a compensating function of human life-- with available time and facilities--was a response to the conditions of people living in America’s crowded cities during the Industrial Revolution. 7. T ® The Industrial Revolution in Europe and America brought a shorter work week and more time and opportunities for people to participate in various recreational activities. r»! LA363WQ02 MTEJtam p3 MULTIflgE CHOIQE (3 pts. each — 30 points) 16. The differences between a Project Plan and a System Plan for parks andtor open spaces are that: a. System Plans should fit within the overall structures and policies of Project Plans. b. a Project Plan is for a specific recreation activity and a System Plan is for greater numbers of those activities on the site. c. a Project Plan projects needs and resources, whereas a System Plan organizes programs in a structured, systematic manner. a Project Plan is site-specific for particular facilities and activities or programs, whereas a System Plan forms a comprehensive strategy for integrating facilities, programs, activities and sites. 17. According to Molnar and Rutledge in Anatomy of A wk, three principles should guide 18. 19. recreation and park design decisions, they are: a. quality at any cost, people need a purpose, and functional needs are paramount. b. user needs, park resources, and the roles of decision makers must be feasible. ® everything must have a purpose, design must be for people, and aesthetic requirements must be satisfied. d. to every season there is a purpose, a balance must be struck, and to error is human. Virtually all methods of recreation and open space planning attempt to (select single best answer): propose policies which exacerbate problems of supply and demand. assure that the time-distance ratio of users to other users is desired. integrate resources and facilities to meet the needs and desires of described users. ensure that recreation and open space facilities are available on demand. P-PP‘P A common and curious phenomenon associated with meeting recreation demands is: -_ that the marketing of recreation has little effect on demand. '0 that the satisfaction of needs often creates new demands c. that an increase in demand leads to greater satisfaction. d. that demand has no direct relationship to needs and desires. M363WQ02 MTExam p.5 25. A common standard used frequently in recreation and open space planning at the community level is: the outer and inner space programming functionalities. the preferred community participation and cycles of use time function. the service radius: time/distance from home to park or recreation facility. the ratio of age groups to population classes by spatial economics. app-s MATCLLING (For questions 26 through 33, 2 pts. Each = 16 pts total) Select the appropriate, or associated, answer from the list on the right for the condition listed on the left. Based on elements of the American Parks Movement: 26. Playground Movement a. Summer programs, arts, music, theatre 27. Necessary compensatory part of life b. Transcendentalist Movement 28. American Parks Movement c. Recreation 29. Chautauqua Movement d. Poor neighborhoods Based on the “Planning Structure diagram" presented in class: 30. Supply a. Human, resources, and economic impacts 31. Opportunities and constraints / b. Users & requirements 32. Demand c. Goals, objectives, policies, standards / (1 Resources. facilities, programs 33. Means, ends, links, principles / LA363 WQ02 MT Exam 1).? 37. Briefly discuss the key aspects of one of the followingfiflf change concerning parks which Diane Balmori in “Park Redefinitions”, Once and Future Park, presents in her essay. (Use opposite side of page): a) The American City, b) Financial Resources and Park Mangement: Public-Private Partnerships, c) Programs for Parks, d) Available Lands, e) Design Process and Players: Collaboration Model, or 0 Relationship of Design and Nature one 0*; we i‘oeem :e arenag 0* 000an COflCfl'l’lll’lC5 pew kQJWOlS \hClUdfid m pmqmnflig f0?" Pal Kg ,ll"; mm; put “I‘ECIM'ICW part , Diane acumen 906‘; m aboui' new guy par‘K‘S Hf“ EU 10 DE?- L' maimed if}: Cnanqfij arm in wmam Ct-dneje . WV parks need 10 DC designed and mum for ongom (:haflqe BU ll"":ai-' may! lagi lo mer cm mm W yil’iElCfi'éel Tlmfi Gig“ \i peiegeg and can be aged inimi‘m‘ure. T.“ are make; comple’re genes because 41“ cm +m$ Mme {mad W0? K 3%“ pm WHO but it“ w: PM} iii"; if: all; 1.4 l - - ' \«VGY‘H- n ‘i L i {L} j} _ me ”bu WM 0 0%» lbv as Lei-"lg. w; veggie-awe. me [p LA363WQ02 MI‘ Exam 20. The three basic types of recreationfleisure demands are: a. induced, expressed, compensatory @ expressed, induced, latent c. unexpressed, observed, implied d. latent, perceived, produced 21. The difference between supply and demand is termed (one answer): a deficiency if demand exceeds supply a surplus if demand is greater than supply. a deficiency if preference is less than satisfaction. a deficiency if supply exceeds demand. 999‘? 22. Which one of the following often forms a primary measure of recreation supply andfor demand? activity participation not expressed or observed time availability related to facility availability intensity of capacity levels willingness to pay for facilities and programs page 23. The success of a leisure behavior survey is primarily based upon: survey design and pre-testing. capitalizing on the number of responses. who is surveyed. the type of processing of questionnaires. s—asrs 24. For the plannerldesigner the conversion of data and information into uséful standards is a means for: showing others that the designer has high standards. ' illustrating a full understanding of the NRPA standards that are commonly used. converting facts into generally abstract results. converting somewhat abstract information into tangible responses that can be applied. 9.09"!” LA363 WQ02 MT Exam p2 / 9 T F 10. T © 1 l. T F 12. T F 13. T F 14. T F 15. T F Frederick Law Olmsted is inappropriately credited as the foremost individual responsible for creating the vision for an American park system as a means for social reform and relief from urban conditions. According to Deborah Karasov in 1 he ane and Future Park, our expectations for public life have not changed greatly since the prototypical American parks were created. Policies that rely on community involvement and consensus, and that state what actions will be taken by decision-makers, have not proven to be effective. According to Gold, most planners and designers place too much emphasis on well-related, defined, and systematic goals and objectives in the park planning process. Reference data differs from primary data in that it has been created for specific purposes related to a particular project or problem. Reference standards differ from performance standards in that they are previously documented standards that may have broad applicability, whereas performance standards may result from the nature and needs of a particular project or problem. For the objective: to determine the recreation carrying capacity of an area: measure the appropriate level of use related to an activity and a resource, with the purpose of sustaining the resource and the recreation experience in good quality. A recreation facility or activity serving a mixed age group can potentially obtain a higher recreation carrying capacity than one serving a group with similar ages. LA363 WQOZ MT Exam [)6 SHORT AESWERS (6 points each = 24 points total) Pre~ 1 e 91 “q 18 u 1 \1 EYW‘K Write response on this page. and ENG I T In 00 Y1 Y1€\ P 1h Vlf 5‘ 01$§€§ 1111:1111 S . 34. Give an example of a design standard related to recreation and open space, and what it is based upon. 1‘1 0139 11810110111d 101011.11 10161216011011 011111 01316er 12:- de V131,; 1 § 1:114 1 JEN ‘1PV1V1K10Y 111.111.7111» 1 01.11:) 1:11:11 1'01 -11.... 11.1.. ..11 11:1 11111111 1111311 “C1111 1.111111111111211 111."- 1113111 1. 01.1101} 11.11.11.111113 35. Explain why and how needs assessment is important to the recreation and open space planning and design process. Necdg 1.1““xcs1 . .1 111 11.101 11.1111 101m r60 {3011011 21.161. 21011111111101 .1111 1eg1g 1211.1: 060011.19 01/16 , - 1. « €vc11uo11e +111». (:11: 1660—1 1111:6011” - , 111/1 191611 . 11 16 11'. 01111 11 611 1.1.1 11 med 1’01 1111011 paVfiCA/laVfl‘aY‘i. men 0 141101111 11011 1116 0111 0 en 66,1316 N11] MS’C 36. 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