7_Cell_communication

7_Cell_communication - Cell Communication Home Page 2006:...

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1 Cell Communication © 2006: D. Julian Home Page Communication by direct contact Campbel and Reece, Fig. 11.3 Some plant and animal cells are directly connected with neighboring cells via junctions. Proteins in the plasma membrane can contact proteins in the membrane of a neighboring cell. © 2006: D. Julian Chemical communication between cells Campbel and Reece, Fig. 11.4 Chemical communication between animal cells can be grouped into three general categories: © 2006: D. Julian
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2 Signal molecules bind to receptor proteins The signal molecule and the receptor are usually specific for each other. Binding of the receptor causes a conformational change in the receptor protein, and this can lead to changes in other “downstream” proteins. Wrong signal Right signal © 2006: D. Julian Overview of cell signaling Campbel and Reece, Fig. 11.5 Signaling can be broken down into three phases: 1) Reception , 2) Transduction and 3) Response © 2006: D. Julian Intracellular steroid hormone receptors Campbel and Reece, Fig. 11.6 Some signaling molecules can pass through the cell
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7_Cell_communication - Cell Communication Home Page 2006:...

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