18_Defenses - Nonspecific Defenses and Immunity Home Page...

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1 Nonspecific Defenses and Immunity © 2007: D. Julian, University of Florida Home Page Overview of vertebrate defenses Campbell, Fig. 43.1 © 2007: D. Julian, University of Florida The immune system © 2007: D. Julian, University of Florida Animals must protect themselves from attack (infection) by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites and foreign (non-self) macromolecules. In vertebrates, this protection is provided by nonspecific ( innate ) immune defenses linked with specific ( acquired ) immune defenses. The invading substances function as antigens that activate antigen- specific T lymphocytes (T cells) and B lymphocytes (B cells). In the process, B lymphocytes differentiate into plasma cells that secrete antigen-specific antibodies (immuno-globulins, Ig). Antibodies neutralize and opsonize antigens and to activate the complement system. Some of the T and B cells have an immunologic memory.
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2 Nonspecific Defense Mechanisms © 2007: D. Julian, University of Florida Phagocytic and natural killer cells Neutrophils : Attracted to chemical signals released by infected and injured cells. Engulf microbes at site of infection, and typically die. Monocytes : Develop into macrophages, which also engulf microbes, but live much monger. Some macrophages wander throughout tissues, while others take up permanent residence in specific tissues (lungs, liver, spleen, lymph nodes). Eosinophils
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course BSC 2010 taught by Professor Bowes during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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18_Defenses - Nonspecific Defenses and Immunity Home Page...

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