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Italian Amercian Culture and Literature Syllabus

Italian Amercian Culture and Literature Syllabus - Italian...

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Unformatted text preview: Italian 4161/4240 The Italian American Experience in Literature and Media Spring 2015 Dr. Carmelo A. Galati Department of French, German, Italian & Slavic 536 Anderson Hall Temple University [email protected] Like the Italian Program on Facebook: Facebook.com/templeitalian Office Hours: Every Wednesday and Friday 1:00 – 1:50 Or by appointment Course Description What is an Italian American? What does it mean to be an Italian American today? During the semester we will answer these questions by studying the portrayals of Italian Americans in literature and media. Recently reality television programming (MTV’s Jersey Shore, Style Network’s Jerseyliscious, Bravo’s The Real Housewives of New Jersey, and HBO’s The Sopranos) has contributed a great deal to the re-­‐‑invention of the Italian-­‐‑American persona. In this course we will take into consideration the above-­‐‑mentioned portrayals and explore how this re-­‐‑invention has affected the Italian-­‐‑American community for better or worse. This is a survey course of the history of the Italian American immigrant and his/her search for an identity. Topics that will be covered will include: the Italian Risorgimento, the Great Wave of Immigration, Sacco and Vanzetti, the effects of World War II, and contemporary Italian American culture. Taught in English. Prerequisites for students enrolled in Italian 4240 Grade of C-­‐‑ or better in one of the following courses: Italian 2096, 2041, 2509, or equivalent. Disability Statement This course is open to all students who meet the academic requirements for participation. Any student who has a need for accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss the specific situation as soon as possible. Contact Disability Resources and Services at 215-­‐‑204-­‐‑1280 in 100 Ritter Annex to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Statement on Academic Freedom Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom. The University has adopted a policy on Student and Faculty Academic Rights and Responsibilities (Policy # 03.70.02) which can be accessed through the following link: http://policies.temple.edu/getdoc.asp?policy_no=03.70.02. Required Texts (Purchased online via Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com) Di Donato, Pietro. Christ in Concrete (New York: New American Library, 1993) Ragusa, Kym. The Skin Between Us (New York: Norton, 2006) Required Films (Widely available to stream online on your own) The Golden Door (Crialese, 2006) Little Caesar (LeRoy, 1931) The Godfather (Coppola, 1972) Big Night (Tucci, 1996) A Wedding for Bella (Martin, 2001) Supplementary Readings (Distributed by Instructor on Blackboard) Barrecca, Regina. Don’t Tell Mama! The Penguin Book of Italian American Writing (New York: Penguin Group, 2002) Gardaphe, Fred. From Wiseguys to Wise Men: The Gangster and Italian American Masculinities (New York: Routledge, 2006) Mangione, Jerre. La Storia: Five Centuries of the Italian American Experience (New York: Harper Collins, 1993) Tamburri, Anthony Julian, Giordano, Paolo A. & Gardaphe, Fred. From the Margin: Writings in Italian Americana (Indiana: Purdue University Press, 2000) Grading and Evaluations Active Participation and Preparation: This course is designed around participation and interaction. Students are required to come to class well prepared on the readings assigned, and be ready to meaningfully contribute to class discussion. As part of your daily preparation you will be expected to come to class with one or two relevant questions/observations pertaining to the reading or viewing material assigned. You will be the ones starting class discussion. If you have questions on the readings, ask me directly. READ SYLLABUS AND PREPARE FOR CLASS DAILY. Students are required to read texts thoroughly prior to class, as assigned. The weekly participation/preparation grade will be assigned as follows: 90-­‐‑100 (A): On time, volunteers frequently, works well with others, is very well-­‐‑prepared for class. Contributes ideas and opinions to class, shows willingness to learn. 80-­‐‑89 (B): On time, well prepared, volunteers occasionally, works well with others. 2 70-­‐‑79 (C): Late, some preparation, speaks only when spoken to, sometimes contributes to group work. 60-­‐‑69 (D): Late, minimally prepared, listens passively, rare and reluctant participation. 00-­‐‑59 (F): Late, little or no preparation, does not contribute to group work, distracts others, OR absent (once or twice) with no documented excuse. Critical Essay: Students will write one informed and accurate four-­‐‑page critical essay on one of the works discussed in class. Essays will be handed in two versions (one first draft, due on February 20, one final version, due on April 27). Please note that the first draft is not a “rough draft”. All written assignments must be typed, double-­‐‑spaced, and follow the MLA style guide. Make sure your essays show that you work constantly to gain a good command of the material, and use feedback constructively. No late assignments will be accepted. Students enrolled in Italian 4240 are required to write in Italian. Your writing will be graded in terms of content and form as follows: A. 90-­‐‑100: Content: clear, message is conveyed effectively, ideas are well organized (in paragraphs and sentences) and connected to one another in a consequential order and with the use of transitions, good amount of details (explanation, examples, evidence, reference to historical background, etc.); Form: Good use of pertinent vocabulary, no grammatical errors, no mechanical errors, good syntax. B. 80-­‐‑89: Content: almost always clear and effective, ideas are mostly well organized (in paragraphs and sentences) and connected to one another in a consequential order and with the use of transitions, good amount of details (explanation, examples, evidence, reference to historical background, etc.). Form: use of pertinent vocabulary, few grammatical errors, few mechanical errors, few syntax problems. C. 70-­‐‑79: Content: not always clear or effective, ideas not always well organized (in paragraphs and sentences) or connected in a consequential order and with the use of transitions, small amount of details (explanation, examples, evidence, reference to historical background, etc.). Form: modest use of pertinent vocabulary, some grammatical errors, some mechanical, some syntax problems. D. 60-­‐‑69: Content: message is unclear, ideas are not well organized (in sentences and paragraphs) and there is no consequentiality and no transitions, small amount or no details (explanation, examples, evidence, reference to 3 historical background, etc.) used. Form: Almost no use of pertinent vocabulary, several grammatical errors, several mechanical errors and awkward syntax. Oral Presentations: Students will give one 10-­‐‑minute oral presentation (in groups) on a subject related to the readings and/or films presented during the course. Students enrolled in Italian 4240 are required to present in Italian during the extra hour of class. Oral History Documentary Project: In groups, students will create a documentary (minimum 10 minutes in length, due on April 24) on the Italian Americans of Philadelphia (or on their own family history) and carry out an oral history interview with at least one Italian American. The project will consist of the following elements: 1. Identification of subject (carried out within the first weeks of class) 2. Approval of interview questions (5%) 3. Interview/Research 4. Final copy of documentary (25%) Exams: Two in-­‐‑class exams on February 27 and April 10. Students enrolled in Italian 4240 are required to complete their exams in Italian Grade Breakdown 5% Attendance, preparation and active class participation 30% Exams 20% Critical Essay 15% Oral presentation 30% Oral History Documentary Course Policies Class attendance is mandatory and you are expected to attend all classes. However, the first 3 absences will not be held against you (use them for illness). After 3 absences, your final grade will be lowered one letter grade for each additional absence. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that they arrive on time each day. Tardiness to class creates a disturbance that disrupts the learning environment and is inconsiderate of others. Students who are 5 or more minutes late to class will be counted tardy. Students will receive two "ʺfree tardies"ʺ. These provide for family emergencies, traffic accidents, etc. A third tardy in a class will constitute an absence. Each tardy in excess of three will constitute an additional absence for that class. For example, three tardies = one absence; four tardies = two absences; a fifth tardy = three absences. No cell phone usage in class. If you are texting you are not actively participating in class. 4 I expect that you will be fully attentive, courteous, respectful, and professional at all times. This means that you will: o Be punctual for all class meetings, you will be ready to begin on time (see tardiness policy above). o Be attentive to the instructor and to all members of the class. o Ask questions when you do not understand what others, including me, say. o Keep your attention focused on the topic at hand. o Do your best to assist others in their learning. Be timely with assignments. A deadline will be given for each assignment, after which no late work will be accepted. Postings regarding this course will appear on Blackboard. Students should check the course site regularly for announcements, assignments, or other information. See me for questions about majoring or minoring in Italian, or about completing a certificate in Italian. For questions on becoming certified to teach Italian at the elementary or secondary level, please contact Dr. Jill Swavely at [email protected] University Policies Disability Statement: This course is open to all students who meet the academic requirements for participation. Any student who has a need for accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss the specific situation as soon as possible. Contact Disability Resources and Services at 215-­‐‑204-­‐‑1280 in 100 Ritter Annex to coordinate reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. Statement on Academic Freedom: Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom. The University has adopted a policy on Student and Faculty Academic Rights and Responsibilities (Policy # 03.70.02) which can be accessed through the following link: http://policies.temple.edu/getdoc.asp?policy_no=03.70.02. Policy on Academic Honesty Temple University believes strongly in academic honesty and integrity. Plagiarism and academic cheating are, therefore, prohibited. Essential to intellectual growth is the development of independent thought and a respect for the thoughts of others. The prohibition against plagiarism and cheating is intended to foster this independence and respect. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of another person'ʹs labor, another person'ʹs ideas, another person'ʹs words, another person'ʹs assistance. Normally, all work done for courses -­‐‑-­‐‑ papers, examinations, homework exercises, laboratory reports, oral presentations -­‐‑-­‐‑ is expected to be the individual effort of the student presenting the work. Any assistance must be reported to the instructor. If the work has entailed consulting other resources -­‐‑-­‐‑ journals, books, or other media -­‐‑-­‐‑ these resources must be cited in a manner appropriate to the course. It is the instructor'ʹs 5 responsibility to indicate the appropriate manner of citation. Everything used from other sources -­‐‑-­‐‑ suggestions for organization of ideas, ideas themselves, or actual language -­‐‑-­‐‑ must be cited. Failure to cite borrowed material constitutes plagiarism. Undocumented use of materials from the World Wide Web is plagiarism. Academic cheating is, generally, the thwarting or breaking of the general rules of academic work or the specific rules of the individual courses. It includes falsifying data; submitting, without the instructor'ʹs approval, work in one course which was done for another; helping others to plagiarize or cheat from one'ʹs own or another'ʹs work; or actually doing the work of another person. Students must assume that all graded assignments and quizzes are to be completed individually unless otherwise noted in writing in this syllabus. I reserve the right to refer any cases of suspected plagiarism or cheating to the University Disciplinary Committee; I also reserve the right to assign a grade of "ʺF"ʺ for the given paper, assignment or quiz. For students registered for Italian 4240: Having other students of Italian proofread your work is considered cheating. If you have others proofread, you must turn in: original work, the proofread version along with corrections, and the final draft. The use of online translators is strongly discouraged and will result in a zero. However, you may use online dictionaries such as Garzanti Linguistica or Wordreference.com. 6 Syllabus The schedule and contents of the course, including assignment dates, are subject to change if circumstances render it necessary. Week 1 01/12-01/16 Introduction to the course: How did we end up here? Discussion of television clips from Jersey Shore, Jerseyliscious and Real Housewives of New Jersey; La Storia, Chapter 1: “Italy Before and After Unification”; Chapter 5: “Italian Unity and the Southern Exodus” Week 2 01/19-01/23 La Storia, Chapter 6: “To leave or Not to Leave” 01/19 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – No classes held Week 3 01/26 – 01/30 La Storia, Chapter 7: “Parting”; Chapter 8: “Arrival”; View selection from Kaos (Taviani, 1984) 01/26 Last day to add or drop a course Week 4 02/02 – 02/06 La Storia, Chapter 9: “Security in Tight Little Islands – The Early Days”; Pietro DiDonato, Christ in Concrete (Chapter 1 and 2) Franco Mulas, “The Ethnic Language of Pietro DiDonato’s Christ in Concrete” Week 5 02/09 – 02/13 Presentation #1 on Christ in Concrete DiDonato, Christ in Concrete (Chapter 3); Fred Gardaphé, “From Oral Tradition to Written Word: Toward an Ethnographically Based Literary Criticism” Week 6 02/16 – 02/20 Week 7 02/23 – 02/27 Critical Essay Draft due 02/20 DiDonato, Christ in Concrete (Chapters 4 and 5); Sandra Gilbert, “New Orleans-Wops, Crime, and Lynchings”; View documentary, Pane Amaro (Bitter Bread): The Italian American Journey from Despised Immigrant to Honored Citizens Presentation #2 on Sacco and Vanzetti and Exam #1 La Storia, Chapter 17: “The Road to Sacco and Vanzetti”; Gerald Meyer, “Sacco and Vanzetti’s Revenge” Week 8 03/02 – 03/06 Spring Break No classes held Week 9 03/09 – 03/13 View documentary, History’s Mysteries: Italian American Internment Sandra Gilbert, “When Italian Americans Were ‘Enemy Aliens” and “How World War II Iced Italian American Culture” 7 Week 10 03/16/ – 03/19 03/17 Week 11 03/23 – 03/27 Presentation #3 on Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather Chapter 20: “The Postwar Years: Organized Crime and Cultural Anger”; Fred Gardaphé, “Romancing the Gangster”; Discussion on Little Caesar and The Godfather; Fred Gardaphé, “The Gangster as Culture Hero: Mario Puzo and Francis Ford Coppola” Last day to withdraw from a course La Storia, Chapter 19: “Changing Images of Italian Americans”; Helen Barolini, “Buried Alive by Language”; Maria Mazziotti Gillan, “Angelina”; Joy Behar, “My Life in Funeral Parlors”; Peter Covino, “Poverty of Language” and “Infidel” Week 12 03/30 – 04/03 George Leonard, “The Italian American Culture of Scenes: Everyday Life as Spectacle” and “Cinema Paradiso: The Italian American Presence in American Cinema”; Discussion on Stanley Tucci’s The Big Night Week 13 04/06 – 04/10 Exam #2 Kym Ragusa, The Skin Between Us (Prologue – Chapter 5) Week 14 04/13 – 04/17 Presentation #4 on The Skin Between Us Kym Ragusa, The Skin Between Us (Chapter 6 – Epilogue) View Melissa Martin’s A Wedding for Bella Week 15 04/20 – 04/24 Oral History Documentary due 04/24 Finish and discuss Martin’s A Wedding for Bella Week 16 04/27 Final draft of critical essay due 04/27 Last day of classes Conclusions: Where do we go from here? Discussion of television clips from Jersey Shore, Jerseyliscious, and The Real Housewives of New Jersey 8 ...
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