First Final Network paper

First Final Network paper - - 1 Gilbreath Computer...

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- 1 Gilbreath Computer Networking By: Jeremy Gilbreath
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- 2 Gilbreath Just over a decade ago, terms like home network, LAN, WEP key, encryption, and network protocol were unknown by the general public. Only the computing elite knew what they were, and how to effectively manipulate them for use in a home or business setting. Fast forward to today, and these concepts are all but vital for everyday life. Instead of using “hooked” when describing an infatuation with something, “plugged in” has become the new phrase. Everyone and their grandma, quite literally, know networking basics and how to use the internet. Broadband, wireless, and secure network have superseded their meanings, and become key buzzwords in advertising. Yet, despite its penetration into homes internationally, the vast majority of users do not understand the key concepts behind networking. The average citizen still needs the aid of a trained professional for network setup and maintenance. Considering the relatively simple nature of modern network configuration tools, it is not outside reason that all network users can successfully create their own networks. With minimal explanation, most American families would be able to successfully maintain the quality of their networking experience. Before a network can be configured, a basic knowledge of a network must be attained. When broken down to its most basic level, a network is simply two or more computers, connected so that they can share information (Jelen 2). The most basic network requires four things: two computers, a network interface card (NIC) for each, a cable to connect them, and network protocol software (3). The computers have the NICs installed onto their motherboards, and the cable plugs into the port on each. Using this connection the NICs use the network protocol, or rules defining how information will be communicated and interpreted, to send information to each other (3). While networks may seem infinitely more complicated than this basic setup, all networking infrastructure can be constructed based on this simple design. To connect more than two computers, a hub or router becomes necessary. The requirements for each computer remain the same, being a cable, NIC, and appropriate network protocol software. Instead of connecting directly to each other, all of the computers are connected to the hub or router. The hub or router, which perform the same function under different principles, connect all of the computers together,
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- 3 Gilbreath instead of a direct one on one connection. When the computers are connected, all the computers can access all information on every computer, but for security purposes, most networks allow access to files only at a specific location (5). A good example of this is in Microsoft’s Windows operating systems. Using their supplied network configurations, users can only access files located in the “Shared” folder in
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First Final Network paper - - 1 Gilbreath Computer...

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