Foundation of Natural Resources - Wilkinson - Fall 2005 - Outline

Foundation of Natural Resources - Wilkinson - Fall 2005 - Outline

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Final – 3 hrs, 2 Qs (one Q will be set in historical time where you have to respond to with the laws and issues of that time) - 1 hr for historical question and 2 for the modern question – try to get inside the issue, don’t just skim issues - one question set in some past year: transport yourself to the time period in the question. You cannot know the future. You will know, however, all then-existing law and events, and any trends that you think relevant. If the exam is set in 1880, you can know the future only in the way that you now know the future from the vantage point of 2005. - give advice about probable future outcomes. just turn a switch in your mind and take yourself back to the year in which the question is set. Who got rich in the W – very early hardrock miners; mining corporations and shareholders (there were big mining corporations by 1880s-discoveries made individually and then bought out by companies); RRs and shareholders; some large ranch spreads that were put together (some by fraud, but not all) Indian and Early American Views of Nature, Property, Government, and Population ‚Rebecca Tsosie, Tribal Environmental Policy in an Era of Self-Determination (1996); ‚The Great New Wilderness Debate (1998); ‚Worcester v. Georgia (1832); ‚Roderick Nash, Wilderness and the American Mind (1982) ‚Thoreau, T HE W RITINGS OF H ENRY D AVID T HOREAU (1865); ‚Thomas Robert Malthus, F IRST E SSAY O N P OPULATION : 1798 (1926); HE P OPULATION E XPLOSION (1990); ‚Ronald Bailey, E CO -S CAM : T HE F ALSE P ROPHETS O F E COLOGICAL A POCALYPSE (1993) Indian views of nature: Homocentric – standing outside the natural world – How most whites and Europeans see/saw it Bio-centric – being a part of the natural world – How Indians see it Indian People did not worship the land, they respected the land, felt themselves equal to it. A sacred site is not a place that is worshiped, it is a place where Indian person will worship the creator. There was no idea of property rights, but they did have tribe or family or clan rights to certain plots to farm or fishing holes, rights to whales on beach and a family’s rights to parts of the whale, etc. These are more use rights rather than property rights as we think of them. Today the tribal counsels are governments and they manage the lands, they own 57 million acres in the country Tsosie Reading: Lakota people see themselves as small part of universe, comparable to a pebble o Wakan Tanka = Great Spirit: controls maj animistic forces Iyan, the Rock; Maka, the Earth; Skan, the Sky; and Wi, the Sun Indigenous understatnding of relationship btwn man and natural evni – humans are part, not above nature o Care more about where important events happen and less about when Western understanding stems from Christianity, capitalism, and technology “nature as commodity,” “wilderness to be tamed,” “to be exploited” Standing Bear (Souix): all things in natural community (rocks, trees, animals) are kin – everything had rights, even
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2008 for the course LAWS 6112 taught by Professor Wilkinson during the Fall '05 term at Colorado.

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Foundation of Natural Resources - Wilkinson - Fall 2005 - Outline

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