The Crucible Test Study Guide - Alliteration Apostrophe alive andpresent Assonance resemblance

The Crucible Test Study Guide - Alliteration Apostrophe...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 4 pages.

Figurative Language List The Crucible  Test Study Guide Alliteration the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of consecutive words Apostrophe   figure of speech in which someone absent or dead OR something nonhuman is addressed as if it were  alive  and present Assonance resemblance of sound in words or syllables Clich é word or phrase that has been overly familiar or commonplace Hyperbole exaggeration, usually with humor Idiom expression used by a particular group of people with a meaning that is only known through common use Imagery language that appeals to the senses Verbal Irony   a figure of speech when an expression used is the opposite of the thought in the speaker's mind, thus   conveying a meaning that contradicts the literal definition Dramatic Irony   a literary or theatrical device of having a character utter words which the reader or audience understands to have a different meaning, but of which the character himself is unaware Situational Irony when a situation occurs which is quite the reverse of what one might have expected Metaphor comparison of two things not using “like” or “as” Onomatopoeia words imitating a noise or sound Personification when nonliving things are given human qualities Simile comparison of two things using “like” or “as”
Plot OverviewN THE PURITAN NEW ENGLAND TOWN of Salem, Massachusetts, a group of girls goes dancing in the forest with ablack slave named Tituba. While dancing, they are caught by the local minister, Reverend Parris. One of the girls, Parris’s daughter Betty, falls into a coma-like state. A crowd gathers in the Parris home while rumors of witchcraft fill the town. Having sent for Reverend Hale, an expert on witchcraft, Parris questions Abigail Williams, the girls’ ringleader, about the events that took place in the forest. Abigail, who is Parris’s niece and ward, admits to doing nothing beyond “dancing.”While Parris tries to calm the crowd that has gathered in his home, Abigail talks to some of the other girls, telling them not to admit to anything. John Proctor, a local farmer, then enters and talks to Abigail alone. Unbeknownst to anyone else in the town, while working in Proctor’s home the previous year she engaged in an affair with him, which led to her being fired by his wife, Elizabeth. Abigail still desires Proctor, but he fends heroff and tells her to end her foolishness with the girls.Betty wakes up and begins screaming. Much of the crowd rushes upstairs and gathers in her bedroom, arguing 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture