Beowulf def. of epic

Beowulf def. of epic - Beowulf Definition of epic from:

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Beowulf Definition of epic from: homepage.mac.com/mseffie/assignments/beowulf/epic.html The Epic The epic is generally defined: A long narrative poem on a great and serious subject, related in an elevated style, and centered on a heroic or quasi-divine figure on whose actions depends the fate of a tribe, a nation, or the human race. The traditional epics were shaped by a literary artist from historical and legendary materials which had developed in the oral traditions of his nation during a period of expansion and warfare ( Beowulf , The Odyssey , The Iliad ). Epic Conventions, or characteristics common to both types include: 1. The hero is a figure of great national or even cosmic importance, usually the ideal man of his culture. He often has superhuman or divine traits. He has an imposing physical stature and is greater in all ways than the common man. 2. The setting is vast in scope. It covers great geographical distances, perhaps even visiting the underworld, other wortlds, other times. 3.
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Beowulf def. of epic - Beowulf Definition of epic from:

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