More Poetry Terms

More Poetry Terms - More Poetry Terms a·naph·o·ra...

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Unformatted text preview: More Poetry Terms a·naph·o·ra (ə-nāf'ər-ə) n. The deliberate repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several successive verses, clauses, or paragraphs; for example, "We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills" (Winston S. Churchill). ballad A poem that tells a story similar to a folk tale or legend and often has a repeated refrain. “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge is an example of a ballad. conceit A fanciful poetic image or metaphor that likens one thing to something else that is seemingly very different. An example of a conceit can be found in Shakespeare's sonnet “Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?” and in Emily Dickinson's poem “There is no frigate like a book.” epigram A very short, witty poem: “Sir, I admit your general rule,/That every poet is a fool,/But you yourself may serve to show it,/That every fool is not a poet.” (Samuel fool,/But you yourself may serve to show it,/That every fool is not a poet....
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course ENGL 120 taught by Professor Sides during the Spring '08 term at Wellesley College.

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More Poetry Terms - More Poetry Terms a·naph·o·ra...

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