Chaucer test notes

Chaucer test notes - Cleric-weird, studied, but not...

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Cleric—weird, studied, but not religious Which characters are idealized, and what might this show about Chaucer’s outlook? More than a satirist. aristocrats peasantry intellectuals What is the role of Chaucer the pilgrim within this group? Is he an objective observer? (See GP 37-41). Pay particular attention to lines GP 727-48 and GP 771-811. How does Chaucer define telling the " truth " in his poem? (The tales of the pilgrims are understood as fiction; what then is "true" about them?) What are the metaphorical implications of a pilgrimage? Why did Chaucer choose this device? While some critics view the Pardoner as "the only lost soul on the Pilgrimage," others argue that he is in fact better than many of his fellow travellers because he is not a hypocrite -- at least in so far as he freely acknowledges his own avarice and is quite blunt about his lack of religious faith. Which assessment do you find more convincing? Be sure to find specific statements to back up your position. At what point did you begin to suspect that the Pardoner’s motives for telling his
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Chaucer test notes - Cleric-weird, studied, but not...

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