5 Presentation Part 10 Choking

5 Presentation Part 10 Choking - Part 10 in Book Relief of...

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Part 10 in Book Relief of Choking
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Relief Of Choking 1 Year Of Age And Older Early recognition of airway obstruction most important You should distinguish between fainting and heart attack, stroke, seizure drug overdose or other conditions that cause sudden respiratory failure
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Choking Facts A choking person's airway may be completely or partially blocked. A complete blockage is an urgent medical emergency. A partial obstruction can quickly become life threatening if the person loses the ability to breathe in and out sufficiently. Without oxygen, permanent brain damage can occur in as little as 4 minutes. Rapid first aid for choking can save a life.
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Choking Causes Eating too fast, failing to chew food well enough, or eating with improperly fitted dentures Alcohol consumption (even a small amount of alcohol affects awareness) Unconscious or stuporous persons may inhale vomited material Small objects inhaled by young children Trauma to the head and face (swelling or blood can cause choking)
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Mild Airway Obstruction Signs from victim Air is still being exchanged Patient is responsive and can cough forcefully May wheeze between coughs Action of Rescuer Encourage victim to continue coughing Do not attempt to interfere with victim’s attempt to expel foreign body If mild persist call EMS
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Severe Airway Obstruction Signs from Victim Poor of no air exchange Weak ineffective or no cough High pitched noise while inhaling Increased respiratory difficulty
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