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ethnocentric - America's melting pot mentality creates...

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America’s melting pot mentality creates conflicting opinions on what defines American culture. The concept that immigrants to America would create a culture that absorbs all and excludes no one is a fallacy that American society has worked to overcome through the last few decades. Desegregation, women’s right to vote and the civil rights movement all contributed to the concept that everyone is equal in American society. While these actions have helped to define American society, they have had little impact on American Culture. Culture cannot impose beliefs and values nor does race and ethnicity determine culture. The public school system in America has often found itself at the center of American culture. Children from all ethnic, racial, social and economic backgrounds are taught a standardized education in every public school system. This education is not dependent on the child’s culture nor does it depend on the culture of the majority. Every child is entitled to the right to learn and is entitled to an education that will further their careers. The United States educational system should not deviate from its standardized multicultural curriculum in favor of an ethnocentric curriculum. Three contentions lie strong to exuberate the necessity to challenge the incorporation of ethnocentric curriculum across the nation. The most important is the lack of a single, and universally identified ethnicity, that reflects the diverse population. The second being that although our history as a country my be considered to most as Eurocentric, Americans have made the steps forward toward a less centered history. The third is that any incorporation of ethnically centered curriculum would in one way or another succeed in excluding all the many groups. These points will clarify that America has in its own way paved the road less traveled, towards and cultural accepting and ethnically tolerant world.
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