DA_Ch1-5 - Textbook for Linguistics 201* 01:615:201:01...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Textbook for Linguistics 201 * 01:615:201:01 Spring 2008 Daniel Altshuler Rutgers University * This is a revised version of Paul de Lacy’s textbook used for Linguistics 201. © January 2008, Daniel Altshuler
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
H OW TO D O W ELL IN THIS C OURSE You must read this section – it contains important information about this course. 1 Introduction For most people, ‘doing well’ in a course means getting a good grade. There is another sense of ‘doing well’, though: understanding all the course material. This section contains tips and advice on how to do well in this course. If you follow all the advice below, I cannot guarantee that you will get a good grade, but it is very likely that you will understand the material much more than you otherwise would have. In fact, if you apply the advice below to all your courses, you may well find learning at university a lot easier. The following sections also contain important information about policies of this course. It is particularly important to read section 2.3, about homework assignments, and section 3, about missing classes, homeworks, and exams. 2.1 How to Start a Course 1. Attend the First Lecture The first lecture in any course is full of important information about the course. One of the most important things is that the lecturer will often explain what the course is really about. Often people think they know what the course is about, but in reality they don’t. This is especially true for Linguistics. The lecturer will also explain how your work will be assessed. Never miss the first lecture. Never be late for the first lecture. If you are late or miss the first lecture, find out exactly what the lecturer said. To do this, ask the lecturer. 2. Get the Textbook If the course has a textbook, get it as soon as possible. As soon as you have the textbook, browse through it. A textbook is not like a novel: reading ahead won’t ruin your education. Simply familiarizing yourself with the layout of the textbook and its style and presentation can make learning a much easier experience. What Not To Do 1. Don’t skip classes If you take a course, it is your responsibility to come to class, and be there on time. Never say to a lecturer “I have another class that overlaps with this one. If I come to this class 20 minutes late, will I miss anything important?” I’ve heard people say this dozens of times. It makes me laugh, in a sad sort of way. The answer is “Yes – you will miss
Background image of page 2
something important” and “Why did you take this course if you don’t plan to attend class?” As to why coming to class is important, read on… 2. The Textbook is not the Course Attending classes is the most important thing about a course. In non-university level courses people sometimes can pass the course by simply reading the textbook. If you try to do this in this course, you will do very poorly and possibly fail. At this point, you might be thinking “But Bob didn’t go to any lectures.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course LING 201 taught by Professor Altshuler during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 24

DA_Ch1-5 - Textbook for Linguistics 201* 01:615:201:01...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online