French literature.docx - French literature From Wikipedia,...

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French literatureFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to navigationJump to searchFrench andFrancophone literatureFrench literatureBy categoryFrench languageFrench literary historyMedieval16th century • 17th century18th century • 19th century20th century • ContemporaryFrancophone literatureFrancophone literatureLiterature of QuebecPostcolonial literatureLiterature of HaitiFranco American literatureFrench-language authorsChronological listFrench writersWriters • NovelistsPlaywrights • PoetsEssayistsShort story writers
FormsNovel • Poetry • PlaysGenresScience fiction • ComicsFantastiqueMovementsNaturalism • SymbolismSurrealism • ExistentialismNouveau romanTheatre of the AbsurdCriticism and awardsLiterary theory • CriticsLiterary prizesMost visitedMolière • Racine • BalzacStendhal • FlaubertZola • ProustBeckett • CamusPortalsFrance • LiteraturePart of a series on theCulture of FranceFlag of France.svgHistoryPeople
LanguagesMythology and folkloreCuisineFestivalsReligionArtLiteratureMusic and performing artsMediaSportMonumentsSymbolsFlag of France.svg France portalvteFrench literature (French: Littérature française) generally speaking, literature written in the Frenchlanguage, particularly by citizens of France; it may also refer to literature written by people living inFrance who speak traditional languages of France other than French. Literature written in the Frenchlanguage, by citizens of other nations such as Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Senegal, Tunisia, Algeria,Morocco, etc. is referred to as Francophone literature. France itself ranks first on the list of Nobel Prizesin literature by country.For centuries, French literature has been an object of national pride for French people, and it has beenone of the most influential components of the literature of Europe.[1][2]One of the first known examples of French literature is the Song of Roland, the first major work in aseries of poems known as, "chansons de geste".[3]The French language is a Romance language derived from Latin and heavily influenced principally byCeltic and Frankish. Beginning in the 11th century, literature written in medieval French was one of theoldest vernacular (non-Latin) literatures in western Europe and it became a key source of literary themesin the Middle Ages across the continent.
Although the European prominence of French literature was eclipsed in part by vernacular literature inItaly in the 14th century, literature in France in the 16th century underwent a major creative evolution,and through the political and artistic programs of the Ancien Régime, French literature came todominate European letters in the 17th century.In the 18th century, French became the literary lingua franca and diplomatic language of western Europe(and, to a certain degree, in America), and French letters have had a profound impact on all Europeanand American literary traditions while at the same time being heavily influenced by these other national

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