lab 6 report[1] - Determining the mass percent of copper in...

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Determining the mass percent of copper in a penny minted between 1982-2005 using colorimetry and Beer’s Law Introduction The purpose of this experiment was to determine how much copper is put into U.S. pennies by a fabricator chosen by the United States Mint using colorimetry and Beer’s Law. The experimenters were informed that the U.S. Mint sends copper and zinc to a fabricator who makes planchets, coin sized discs, which are returned to be minted. The experimenters were instructed to find the amount of copper present in a random sampling of pennies using a colorimeter and Beer’s Law, which relates absorbency to concentration. This experiment could be particularly useful as it could prove to the officials at the U.S. Mint that the fabricators of the penny are either accurate or inaccurate. This experiment could save the U.S. Mint money if the fabricators are putting too much copper in the pennies. Experimental Procedure The experimenters needed to divide the tasks of this lab in order to maximize time spent using the calorimeter. A penny selected randomly was weighed and recorded. The next step was to measure 15mL of nitric acid and carefully place in a beaker, being sure to avoid spills and contact due to high acidity. The beaker was placed under the fume hood and the penny was dropped into the acid. The fumes of the solution were hazardous
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lab 6 report[1] - Determining the mass percent of copper in...

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