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Lungs, Pleura, and Mechanics of Breathing Notes

Lungs, Pleura, and Mechanics of Breathing Notes - Lungs...

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Lungs, Pleura, and Mechanics of Breathing: Notes to accompany the PowerPoint handout distributed on 21 February 2008. The handout covers pages 102-152 in Gray’s Anatomy for Students . Many of the slides in the lecture PowerPoint contain self-explanatory information. However, in a few instances, I have expanded or made some additional comments in red font . Please be sure to read these comments below in addition to reviewing the PowerPoint handout and the assigned textbook pages. Slide 1: Title. Slide 2: Objectives. Slide 3: Lungs. Slide 4: Lungs. Please consult your atlas to make sure you can identify the fissures and lobes. Slide 5: Lungs. The surface names/descriptions refer to surfaces of the lungs themselves. Later in the handout, you will see the names/descriptions of the different regions of parietal pleura (Slide 24). Please be careful not to confuse them. Slides 6 and 7: Lungs. Please also see figure 3.40 on page 141 in Gray’s Anatomy for Students (reproduced in the next slide). The pulmonary sleeve is the part of the pleura that surrounds the root, and it is continuous with the part labeled as “pulmonary ligament”. You can see in these two figures that the ligament is double-layer and the pulmonary sleeve is single-layer. Slide 8: This image is also from your textbook. It nicely illustrates the 3-D space of the right pleural cavity. The cut edges of the pulmonary ligament and the pulmonary sleeve match up to the cut edges seen in the previous image. The relationship of the lungs to the pleura and pleural cavities can illustrated by using your fist and an under-inflated balloon as an analogy. Your fist represents the lung itself, and the under-inflated balloon represents the pleurae. When you shove your fist into the balloon, the part of the balloon that is in direct contact with your fist represents the visceral layer of pleura. The layer that is not in direct contact with your fist represents the parietal layer of pleura. The pleural cavity is located between the two layers of pleura. Normally, this potential space contains only a clear, thin film of pleural fluid. Since the two layers of the pleura are continuous with each other at the root of the lungs, the terminology (visceral or pleura) is determined by the structures the layers are in contact with.
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