Final for American Gov - Final Exam for American Govt...

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Unformatted text preview: Final Exam for American Govt CHAPTER 11, Congress Highest PriorityCongress Constituency Founding fathers wanted representative government to make decisions for the people, Lawmaking institution for the entire federal government, Representative assembly for state and local interests, Majority Leader Organizes floor debate and lines up legislative support, the Senate Majority Leader Most powerful position, but not presiding officer, Chairs policy committee and formulates party policies, Acts as partys voice, schedules debate, Standing Standing Committees review bills and provide oversight of particular policy areas, The House has 20 standing committees , The Senate has 16 standing committees Committee power Bills introduced in Congress must be sent to the appropriate committee for review A major source of power However, as issues become more complex, jurisdiction lines blur Subcommittee lines more clearly drawn (Read Chapter 11 notes!) After the president The Speaker of the House is the next in Power, Modern Congress 17th Amendment (1914) changed election of senators to vote by the people Also, modern congress are mostly professional politicians who stay in as a career Spending Campaign Fund-Raising: Raking in the Money, Open-seat election involves heavy spending (less spending needed for incumbents), Congress specifically granted powers are taxation, spending, Leaders/leadership Congressional Leadership, Party caucus elects leaders, Party leaders then represent the partys interests in the chamber, Speaker of the House (Nancy Pelosi [D-CA]) 1. Member of the majority party and organizes its policies, 2. Probably second most powerful person in D.C., 3. Formal powers can be used to support or kill a bill House Majority Leader (Steney Hoyer [D-MD]), Organizes floor debate and lines up legislative support House Minority Leader (John Boehner [R-OH]), Heads party caucus and helps develop policy stances House Majority Whip (James E. Clyburn [D-SC]) Assists Majority leader in gathering votes & informing members about important votes House Minority Whip (Roy Blunt [R-MO]) Assists Minority leader in gathering votes & informing members about important votes President of Senate (Vice President Dick Cheney), Presides over the Senate (essentially ceremonial), Can vote to break a tie President pro tem of the Senate (Robert C. Byrd [D-WV]), Presides in absence of the VP Honorary position granted to majority partys senior member Senate Majority Leader (Harry Reid [D-NV]) Most powerful position, but not presiding officer Chairs policy committee and formulates party policies Acts as partys voice Senate Minority Leader (Mitch McConnell [R-KY]) Heads party caucus and helps develop policy stances Senate Majority Whip (Richard Durbin R-IL]) Assists Majority leader in gathering votes & informing members about important votes Senate Minority Whip...
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course POL 1013.007 taught by Professor Calder during the Spring '08 term at The University of Texas at San Antonio- San Antonio.

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Final for American Gov - Final Exam for American Govt...

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