What if the miscommunication between a doctor and his patient was just self

What if the - 1 Palmer Miscommunication in the MD's Office Wesley Palmer Dr Goodman Research Paper 2 Palmer Miscommunication in the MD's Office

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1 Palmer Miscommunication in the MD’s Office Wesley Palmer Dr. Goodman Research Paper
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2 Palmer Miscommunication in the MD’s Office Everyone knows the feeling of sitting in a doctor’s office and waiting for the doctor to come in. The feeling of what should I say, and what will he say. This feeling is felt but many people across the world. The stereotype for doctors and patients clearly illustrates this, doctors are mean and patients are dumb. These two stereotypes provide us a window into why in many cases there ends up being a miscommunication between doctors and patients. Western doctors have been trained to look only at the biomedical aspect, focusing more on the disease rather than on the patient. While on the other hand, patients are typically concerned with trying to describe their problem. This poses a problem when the patients are trying to describe their issue. Physicians typically control conservation and interrupt patients with questions and comments, and use words and phrasing, which is hard for patients to understand. This is where the focus of this paper will lay, the miscommunication between doctors and patients lie in the training practices of western doctors to focus on the biomedical approach rather than using communication as the central mode of determining the problem. Language is but one component of communication. Patients and doctors interpret cues based upon building blocks of culturally determined beliefs. (Medicine and Psychiatry, 1991)
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3 Palmer Today the Mexican American populations are the fastest growing sub group of our population. This poses a large problem in areas such as California and Texas where the largest population of Mexican Americans reside. Several aspects of Mexican communication style require both speakers to know and understand to be able to communicate effectively. Mexican Americans prefer health professionals that utilize simpatia, personalismo, and respeto. “Personlismo is formal friendliness.” (Medicine and Psychiatry, 1991) This personal friendliness is an attitude where the patient views the doctor as an authority, and the doctor is expected to show warmth in return. This coincides with sampatia, which is, “the concern for others expressed through personal warmth”. (Medicine and Psychiatry, 1991) These conversational styles are paramount while dealing with a Mexican American patient. According to Erzinger, “In other words, style is not something extra added on like frosting on a cake. It is the stuff of which the linguistic cake is made”. (Medicine and Psychiatry, 1991) Lastly, Mexican Americans also rely on respeto, which is a rule of conduct, which means respect. These unspoken “rules of conduct” which the doctor and the patient must abide by is where the communication between an American doctor and a Mexican patient would go array. “The overall success of the medical encounter is determined by how the doctor and the patient each assist in the completion of the others communicative tasks. (Medicine and Psychiatry, 1991)
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course MSC 304 taught by Professor Dr.goodman during the Fall '08 term at Ursinus.

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What if the - 1 Palmer Miscommunication in the MD's Office Wesley Palmer Dr Goodman Research Paper 2 Palmer Miscommunication in the MD's Office

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