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1 RUNNING HEAD: CASE STUDY ANALYSIS 1 Case Study Analysis 1 Brittney Riddle Galen College of Nursing NSG 3300: Concepts of Pathophysiology of Nursing Linda Blevins, DNP, MFA, RN, ELS July 15, 2021
2 RUNNING HEAD: CASE STUDY ANALYSIS 1 Case Study Analysis 1 “A postoperative sternal wound infection can be classified as a superficial sternal wound infection or also known as SSWI (Surgical Site Infections, 2021)”. These infections can occur within thirty days of a procedure and can be seen by purulent drainage from the incision site, positive organisms in the wound culture, redness with tenderness, fever or swelling at the site (Surgical Site Infections, 2021). A SSWI can only be diagnosed by the cardiac surgeon who performed the procedure or an adjacent physician in this patients’ team of medical professionals. When an infection of the surgical site is suspected, a broad-spectrum antibiotic can be started until wound cultures come back for a more narrowed look at what would be the best way to fight the infection (Surgical Site Infections, 2021). Postoperative labs that can be drawn may include a basic metabolic panel (BMP), complete metabolic panel (CMP), complete blood count (CBC), lactic acid and blood cultures. BMP focuses on kidney health, blood glucose levels, electrolyte balance and metabolism whereas the CMP focuses on the liver including albumin, bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase. Testing in the CBC, the red count, white count, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets can all be seen (U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2020). When there are lower oxygen levels in the blood, the lactic in the body increases which can happen when there is an infection in the body; which is why a lactic acid is usually drawn in the first line to detect an infection (U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2020). With these labs being drawn that can come back right away, testing blood cultures may take more than a few days to come back. While treating someone with a postoperative incision infection with broad-spectrum antibiotics, the most common bacteria that can come from an incision site can be Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus or Streptococcus (Surgical Site Infections, 2021). These germs can be spread through caregiver touch cleaning the wound,
3 RUNNING HEAD: CASE STUDY ANALYSIS 1 germs in the air around the wound, or even germs that already live inside the body and travel to the incision site. Factors that make it harder to fight these infections may contribute to

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