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TRIT - Tbflfil Hated and clarified Examplr 1 Example 2...

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Unformatted text preview: Tbflfil Hated and clarified Examplr 1 Example 2 Exanple 3 ILLUSTRATION The simplest way to explain something is to give an example of it; so the commonest and most useful pattern of organization consists of a thesis explained or illustrated by examples. Birds reared in isolation from their kind do not generally know what species they belong to; that is to say, not only their social reactions but also their sexual desires are directed towards those beings with whom they have spent certain impressionable phases of their early youth. Consequently, birds raised singly by hand tend to regard human beings, and human beings only, as potential partners in all reproductive activities. A female barnyard goose which I now possess was the only survivor of a brood of six, of which the remainder all succumbed to avian tuberculosis. Consequently she grew up in the company of chickens and, in spite of the fact that we bought for her, in good time, a beautiful gander, she fell head over heels in love with our handsome Rhode Island cock, inundated him with proposals, jealously prevented him from making love to his hens, and remained absolutely insensible to the attentions of the gander. The hero of a similar magi-comedy was a lovely white peacock of the Schonbrunn Zoo in Vienna. He too was the last survivor of an earlyvhatched brood which perished in a period of cold weather, and to save him, the keeper put him in the warmest room to be found in the whole Zoo, which at that time was in the reptile house with the giant tortoises. For the rest of his life this unfortunate bird saw only in those huge reptiles the object of his desire and remained unresponsivelto the charms of the prettiest peahens. _ . . Another tame adult male jackdaw fell in love with me and treated me » exactly as a female of his kind. By the hour, this bird tried to make me creep into the nesting cavity of his choice, a few inches in Width. He became most importunate in that he continually wanted to feed me with what he consid- ered the choicest delicacies. Remarkably enough, he recognized the human mouth as the orifice of ingestion and he was overloyed 1t 1 opened my lips to him, uttering at the same time an adequate begging note. This must be considered as an act of self-sacrifice on my part, since even I Cannot pretend 'to like the taste of finely minced worms, generously mixed with jackdaw saliva. You will understand that I found it difficult to cooperate with the bird in this manner every few minutes! But if I did not, I had to guard my ears against him; otherwise, before I knew what was happening, the passage of one of these organs would be filled right up to the drum with warm worm pulp, for jackdaws, when feeding their female or their young, push the food mass, with the aid of their tongue, deep down into the partner’s pharynx. However, this bird only made use of my ears when I refused him my mouth, on which the first attempt was always made. (Konrad Z. Lorenz, King Solomon’s Ring) In the opening paragraph the author first states his thesis and clarifies it by a few additional sentences, so that the reader knows, as well as he or she can be told in a short paragraph, the main idea to be developed. Then he illustrates that idea by three examples drawn from his experience. These examples drive the point home for a reader. Without them, most readers would be less sure what the author meant by his introductory paragraph. The examples also provide most of the interest of the paper. One professor uses the letters T, R, and I to label the parts of the illustrative patterrL* The T marks the thesis (or in a single paragraph the topic sentence); the R stands for restriction, the additional comment that explains the thesis; and the I indicates the illustrations or examples. Thus in the selection you have just read, the underlined sentence would be labeled T, the test of the first paragraph would be marked R, and the three examples together would be marked I. If the author had added a concluding paragraph restating the thesis, that paragraph would also have to be marked T. In that case, the structure of the Sclection would be TRIT. The use of this structure can be quickly seen in the followmg paragraph, in which the underlined opening sentence is T. The next two sentences explain or clarify the first and so are marked R. The next two sentences are examples of the claim made in the topic sentence and are marked I. The restatement of the topic sentence in the last sentence calls for a second T. By a strange perversity in the cosmic plan, the biologically good die I T achievements The tribes that slumber in the graveyards of the past were not the most simple and undistingiished of their day, but the most complicated __ and conspicuous. The magnificent sharks of the Devonian period passed with the passing of the period, but certain contemporaneous genera of primitive shellfish are still on earth. Similarly, the lizards of the Mesozoic eta have long outlived the dinosaurs who were immeasurably their biologic bettets. Illus- trations such as these could be endlessly increased. The price of distinction is death. (John Hodgden Bradley, “ls Man an Absurdity?”) young. Species are not destroyed for their shortcomings but for their 1 R The following paragraph is based on The Once and Future King, a story about King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. It deals with the education of young Arthur, who for a brief time was turned into first an ant, then a goose, by his teacher, Merlin the magician. The paragraph has a TRIT structure. Can your class agree in labeling its parts? Arthur’s adventurs as an ant and a goose were contrasted lessons in . government, designed by Merlin to prepare him for kingshipi) Each illus- trated a society in operation, and Arthur was expected to learn a lesson from the contrast. As an ant, he saw the tyranny of a dictatorship which reduced individuals to automatons. The ants had no freedom. Their lives were governed by "Done” and "Not done,” and what was done or not was decided by their leader. By contrast, as a goose, Arthur saw how individuals lived in a free society, The geese chose their leaders freely for their skill in navigation and followed them willingly but were not subject to them. They accepted the mutual responsibility of taking turns as guards to warn of the approach of danger, but the thought of war With their own kind was shocking to them. In the contrasted lessons of the ants and the geese, Merlin showed Arthur society at its worst and its best. ...
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