Notes Ch 15 - As we enter the final week of the class we...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 5 pages.

As we enter the final week of the class, we look at what is arguably one of the mostimportant, widely studied, and commonly discussed events in American history: The Civil War.As we have moved through the class, we have seen how the different sections of the country (North and South) developed differently and consequently had troubleswith each other. At the center of these debates was usually slavery and whether or not it should be allowed to expand in newly gained territory. The Missouri Compromise, the Compromise of 1850, and the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 were all attempts to deal with the problem of the expansion of slavery once and forall.The reading this week will focus on the specific events that led to war. With the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, the Deep South states felt they had no other choice than to secede from the Union. South Carolina led the way in this in December of 1860. She was followed quickly by six other Southern states.The war lasted much longer than either side thought it would. Both the North and the South believed it would be over quickly, though it did not take long for both sides to realize that it would be a long war and in many ways a total war. The Northern victory at Shiloh in April 1862 revealed how bloody and deadly a conflictthis would be.Eventually the resources of the North, including her huge advantage in manpower, began to show, and the South was forced to admit defeat beginning in April 1865. As you will see in the final lecture The Hard Hand of War, the effects of the war onthe South were particularly devastating, and their resentment at losing did not die easily.Identify major figures and events in American history to 1865.Describe the stages of American national development to 1865.Explain how political, economic, military, diplomatic, religious and cultural factorsinfluenced American development to 1865. The main difference between the North and South was the contention of slavery.SC, GA, FL, AL, MS, LA, TX seceded in 1860.Chapter 15: Secession and the Civil War 1860-1865Key Events
1860Lincoln elected President (Nov)South Carolina secedes from the Union (December). p 3911861Rest of Deep South secedes. p 392Confederacy is founded (January-February). p 393Fort Sumter is fired upon and surrenders to Confederate forces (April). p 395Upper South secedes (April-May). p 396South wins first battle of Bull Run (July). p 4001862Grant captures forst Henry and Donelson (Feb). p 401Farragut captures New Orleans for the Union (April). p 402McClellan leads unsuccessful campaign on the peninsula SE of Richmond (March-July). p 401McClellan stops Lee at battle of Antietam - the bloodiest battle (Sep). p 401Lee defeats Union army at Fredericksburg (Dec). p 4021863Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation (Jan). p 403North gains major victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg (July). p 407Grant defeats Confederate forces at Chattanooga (Nov). p 4071864Grant and Lee battle in northern Virginia (May-June). p 408Atlanta falls to Sherman (Sep). p 408Lincoln is re-elected president, defeating McClellan (Nov) p 408Sherman marches through Georgia (Nov-Dec). p 4081865Grant captures Petersburg and Richmond: Lee surrenders at Appomattox (April). p 408Lincoln assassinated by John Wilkes Booth (April) p 411Remaining Confederate forces surrender (April-May) p 410Key TermsCooperationists: p 392 In late 1860 southern secessionists debated two strategies: unilateral secession by each state or "cooperative" secession by the South as a whole. The cooperationists lost the debate.Crittenden compromise: p 394 Faced with the specter of secession and war, Congress tried and failed to resolve the sectional crisis in the months between Lincoln's election and inauguration. The leading proposal, introduced by KentuckySenator John Crittenden, would have extended the Misssouri Compromise line west to the Pacific.Greenbacks: p 399 Paper currency issued by the Union beginning in 1862.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture