Russel Fall2000 ExamII Music MU121

Russel Fall2000 ExamII Music MU121 - MUl’ZS—Ol Music...

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Unformatted text preview: MUl’ZS—Ol Music Appreciation Nani. Dr. Craig H. Russell Exam No. 2, November 3, 2000 Multiple Choice: mark the letter of the correct answer on your Scantron (2 pts) 1. Imagine that you have discovered a music manuscript in an archive in Poland and reconstruct it. Upon listening to this newly discovered work you notice that it is rich in contrast, is extremely grandiose and theatrical, is rich in detail, and has steady rhythms that cause the D melodies to unravel and unwind. Those traits would indicate the work was probably from A. Mars B. the Renaissance C. the 12th-century D. the Baroque E. the troubadours 2. The numbers 3 and 4 in the Middle Ages were sometimes referred to as the A. tripod and quadrapod B. spirit and earth numbers C. triluvial and quantum p} D. golden mean and measure E. perfect and proportional ratios 3. During the Middle Ages the modes were A. four scales systems inherited from the Greeks, each with its own “power” and each with A two important tonal centers. B. a collection of dance pieces that were common in troubadour music. C. the dances invented by the Greeks that were exceedingly sensual (and thus banned). D. a family of instruments, each of which had six strings and frets, but they were bowed like a cello instead of plucked like a guitar. E. instrumental works that were oratorios and syllabic in construction. 9 A , Q A style of singing arose in the Baroque that was very speech—like. It followed the natural declamation of the words, had no steady beat, had a sparse musical accompaniment, and it did not allow the cutting apart and rearranging or repetition of text. This style is called Nitomello \B\recitative C. concertino D. chorale E. cantata 5. Of the following, which is strongly associated with the Renaissance? ._ A. monophony /B. Reformation C. Crusades ‘5 D. Industrial Revolution E. concerto grosso @A composition in several movements for a single instrument or small group of instrum’ents { that is usually in several movements that contrast in tempo and character is called a(n) 3 Among. B.courante concerto D. sonata j; cantata \. . \ @A work that emphasizes a sacred topic, uses vocal soloists and usually as a choir, in addition V) to an orchestra, and that uses no scenery or costumes, is cal a(n) A. concerto 13.4mm Cropera D. ratorio E. Mass If something is performed in the neumatic style, then x A. the violinists are improvising over a repeated bass line. Q I B. two different groups alternate in singing the same melody lines. "OW ‘ there is considerable word painting in the ritornello. @each syllable of text is set to two or three different pitches. . every instrument repeats the same line but at a progressively higher level. 9. Which of the following characteristics would most likely be found in an aria? , A. a thin, sparse accompaniment C. a courante or gigue B. an irregular or vague pulse D. a carburetor & distributor cap E. a singable "catchy" tune . music universalis, musica humana, and musica instrumentalis. . sacred music, secular music, and vernacular music. A C. dialectic, rhetoric, and frottola. D. expressive, logical, and corporeal. E. direct, indirect, and responsive. 10? the Middle Ages, music was classified into three levels, which were 11. Boethius was the musician who was responsible for A. inventing the sonata in the late Baroque. B. selling Church favors and indulgences and thus enragng Martin Luther. arriving at a definition of music in the Middle Ages. C . providing the lyrics for most of Johann Sebastian Bach's many operas. E. accidentally creating the concerto grosso while attempting to revive Greek music. 12. The trivium and the quadrivium were the A. two most important Church services celebrated by monks and nuns. p B. Greek systems of scales and rhythms that were "rediscovered" in the Renaissance. most common formal structures found in Baroque Period concertos. @the subjects that comprised the fields of study in a Medieval university. 13. In the Middle Ages, music was defined as being A. the combination of beautiful sounds for the edification of humankind. B. the audible resonance of heavenly love through musical instruments. . C. the expression of human emotion in praise of God. a . the offering of the Church to God, and thus the only antidote to sin. @ number made audible (mathematics that we can hear). 14. Of the following, which is NOT a major philosophical precept during the Middle Ages? A? Applied experience and reason will lead to “trut ”—even in matters that contradict faith. «\’ B. All things in nature—both living and inanimate—have specific tendencies or properties. \/ C. There is numerology in all of the cosmos. Numbers, ratio and proportion can be found in all of God’s creations. . 4/ D. All things in the cosmos are interrelated. Even the planets and the farthest stars touch our ‘ lives in very real ways. ,\x E. Numbers themselves have specific “qualities”——in a sense they could be viewed as having “personalities.” A 15. A bass line that is played by a bass instrument and at least one improvising chordal ’ instrument is 0 ed a(n) {27 A. ostinato B basso continuo C. contrabass D. ritornello E. concertino 16. During the Baroque Period music w s meant primarily to A. appeal the intellect. . appeal to emotion C. numerical symbolism 13 D. be soothing and "sweet" E. reflect the Church's views 17. A Middle Ages composer in the Ars Nova (New Art) who is known for his highly structured compositions, his use of both duple and triple meters, and his Notre Dame Mass which is the first polyphonic setting of the Ordinary by a single composer, is _. He worked at various A courts in different capacities, including a stint with John, king of Bohemia in 1323, and later for the royal family of France. At age 60 he fell in love with a 19-year-old noblewoman, P’ronne—for whom he wrote Voir fit (Tale of Truth). A achaut B. Monteverdi C.Weelkes D. Palestrina E. Rarneau 18. The Chorale was r. A. a secular piece for voices singing a cappella and intended as the introductory movement of i a church suite. B. the large group of instruments that play in an Italian baile: they are contrasted with the smaller ritomello grouping. C. the part of the Medieval Mass in which all of the singers are divided into two groups and alternate back and forth. @a hymn sung in German intended initially for congregational singing with simple, tuneful O melodies in strophic form. E. a small group of instrumental soloists in a Medieval isorhythmic motet. 19. If a melody is passed between two different choirs, so that one choir responds to the other choir, and they exchange answers back and forth, the performance style is called p; A. antiphonal B. neumatic C. melismatic D. responsorial E. diastematic 20. In order for Baroque musicians to sustain larger and longer works, they sometimes employed a form in which an orchestral instrumental tag was heard at the beginning in a / complete statement, and then was played in different keys in the middle in abbreviated ‘82 statements. This orchestral tag is called a(n) A. oratorio B. concerto C. recitative D. fugue ritornello 21. Medieval philosophers considered the microcosm to be A. the small world that could be seen in algebra. In their eyes, all of nature (the macrocosm) could be described in equations (the microcosm). fl B. anything smaller than God himself. The God was the macrocosm, and humans were only ’ capable of seeing the microcosm (the universe around us). ‘ ©the human being who was a miniature encapsulation of the universe. The human being was thus a small reflection of the entire cosmos. D. the five basic substances of matter of the larger universe as seen on earth: there was spirit, solid, liquid, gas, and music. E. the seven scales used by the Greeks: each of the scales represented the seven stars in the Big Dipper. n 22. Monteverdi, in his defense against the attacks of Artusi, stated that he was an advocate of .“ econd practise,” a style based on the idea that @music should serve the words (i.e. words are more important). I< . words should serve the music (i.e. music is more important). C. the only important criterion of a piece was whether it pleased God. D. music had its own logic and that verbal descriptions were impossible. E. music must be rhythmic above all other things—Artusi was too “floaty” for Monteverdi’s taste. (\ \,\2?}€ubjects, counter-subjects, and episodes are most meaningful in discussing ( A. organum B. musica humana C. fugues —A ‘ D. chorales E. recitative f“ 24. Of the following, who was relatively well traveled—having worked in Germany, Italy, and / England during the first half of the eighteenth century—and became so endeared to the @ British public and royalty that he was buried in London in Westminster Abbey? When his opera troop went bankrupt he had a breakdown, but he later recovered and continued to write splendid oratorios and operas. XHildegard von Bingen B. Giovanni Bardi C. Antonio Vivaldi \D.\Johann Sebastian Bach E. George Frederick Handel 25. If an instrument or group of instruments were to play a series of movements that‘nad thE names, "Allemande," "Courante," "Sarabande," and "Gigue," it WQ (1 be a(n) (a A. cantata B. oratorio C. organum D. motet ' . suite 26. Opera was invented around the year / A- A. 1200 ‘ B. 1350 C. 1480 ' D 1600 E. 1750 0 O 27. Which of the following would NOT really be aglicable to a madrigal? ‘ A. a cappella performance . reverent, holy, Church—like feeling b B. use of regular, everyday language D. word painting E. use of polyphony or homophony 28. Which of the following is NOT true with respect to the Renaissance? k A. Modern languages (English, Italian, French, Castillian, etc.) began to replace Latin as @ the preferred language in poetry and literature. Humans became increasingly concerned with church music and as a result began to ignore secular art forms almost completely. 1 C. Artists began to feel that art could be for the benefit of man while in this world, and not just to win salvation to the next heavenly world. «\ D. There was much more interest in politics and secular affairs than previously in the Middle Ages. L E. It was the Age of Exploration with the Portuguese exploring the coast of Africa, followed by the other European nations who were soon sailing all across the globe. {’7 p 29. Of the following characteristics, which is NOT representative of Renaissance painting? A. Secular scenes abound, such as portraits of wealthy patrons, drawings of musicians and dancers, etc. They are meant to be delightful to humans as opposed to sacred paintings [\x intended to lead one to salvation. Q) 5, B1 In paintings of the Virgin and Christ, they become “flat,” less life-like and less realistic in their V physical features. They become more balanced in their poses—in direct imitation of the highly-stylized and flat images found in ancient Greek pottery. k C. There is a fascination with perspective and vanishing points that provide a feeling of depth and proportion—duplicating the way that the human eye perceives things. 3t D. There are paintings of the nude figure, reflecting a new respect for the way humans appear and are made. 2‘ Of the following events or attitudes, which were largely responsible for propelling Western civilization out of the Renaissance into the emotions of the Baroque: A. invasion of the Mongols into Germanic lands around 1338 and the invention of the printing press in Holland in the year 928 AD. \' Q. B. Luther's interest in Greek culture and his translations of Greek theological writings, 3 especially at the Council of Trent in 1186 AD. first Star Trek episode, the first Bob Dylan album, the establishment of the Motown Empire in Detroit, and the inVCntion of the chocolate chip cookie—all in 864 AD. D. invention of mass—produced paper in 1125 that made books suddenly affordable, and the opening of overland trade routes to Russia in 1296. E. West's contact with Islamic culture during the Crusades throughout the twelfth century and the reconquest of the Iberian peninsula that finally was completeby 1492. 31. Of the following, who was a late Baroque composer who was a spectacular organist but not very famous in his lifetime as a composer? He had many sons who were excellent musicians in their own right. rthermore, he wrote some splendid cantatas based on Chorale tunes. ‘9 A. Handel Bach C. Weelkes D. Artusi E. Gutenberg . “A: " \\ ’ 32.9273 concept titled "Mu51c of the Spheres" stated that up . . A. humans were in charge of their own "sphere" (=the earth) during the1r temporary reign on this planet. Thus, the human ear and human sensibilities were of prime importance. B. there are twelve notes that are all separated from each other by the distance of an octave. If one ascends from note to note—octave by octave—one completes a circle or "sphere of pitches." C. all music was spherical in nature: any resonating body generated music by cyclic actions (up—down—up-down . . or back—and forth-and back-and forth . . .) Thus "perfect" music was circular as opposed to angular or "imperfect" music. we heavenly bodies that revolved around the earth actually made music. Thus the harmony of nature and of God's heaven was musical. Whenever humans died and made it to heaven, they too would hear this gorgeous music. 6\ E. there were three kinds of vocal music: sacred, military, and courtly. Each of these “spheres” or styles was not to be confused with the other two. It was not until the Baroque that these styles began to be co—mingled. lax a q; 33. Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and Machiavelli were all active at roughly the same time as \{Bach and Hildegard B\Gérard Estampie and Perotin E Vivaldi and Machaut D. the troubadours & the Crusades E. Jos uin & Palestrina Q) , q 34. The concept that there is inherent ' ity and value in humankind is called A. secularism B. egocentrism umanism D. empiricism E. dadaism U 35. The "rebirth" or rediscovery of the ancient Greek and Roman traditions that so excited the cultures of Western Europe during the Renaissance was made possible largely by previous events (especially the thelfth century onward), most notably the A. invasion of the Mongols into Germanic lands around 1338 and the invention of the U printing press in Holland in the year 928 AD. B. Luther's interest in Greek culture and his translations of Greek theological writings, especially at the Council of Trent in 1186 AD. . first Star Trek episode, the first Bob Dylan album, the establishment of the Motown Empire in Detroit, and the invention of the chocolate chip cookie—all in 864 AD. D. invention of mass-produced paper in 1125 that made books suddenly affordable, and the opening of overland trade routes to Russia in 1296. E. West's contact with Islamic culture during the Crusades throughout the twelfth century and the reconquest of the Iberian peninsula that finally was complete by 1492. 36. A religious piece for use in church—but that stylistically resembled “street music”—and (A t combined African—American elements with European elements was the guineo B>piano C>motet D. gallarda Effandango 37. Of the following works, which begins with a majestic march that conjures up the jubilant mood of a wedding march? There are three levels of activity in this march, with a choir he singing a Chorale melody in slow note values. . Handel’s suite “Oops I Did It Again” \S Hildegard’s cantata “Primavera” \B\Vivaldi’s conce o “O sucessores” D. Bach’s cantata “Wachet auf.” Machaut’s motet “Ave Maria” A 38. The Camerata was a group A. of philosophers dedicated to the suppression of Luther and his movement. ©. of drama fans in Florence who were interested in reviving Greek drama. \0 C. of German knights who wrote down the first recorded dance music. D. of soloists within a sonata (the large group being the concertino). E. of photographers in Cayucos who invented the flash bulb and dark room. 'w 39. The cumbé was a(n) y A. percussion instrument (that is, a drum) used by Native Americans during the Spanish Conquest. Most often, they were played in groups of three or four at civic functions. . musical category during the Renaissance that combined poetry, drama, choral singing, 5‘, ‘orchestral music, and fireworks in a magnificent display of royal pageantry. %. interlude in an oratorio that typically was introspective, sad, and often even tragic. It had evolved from epic poetry from the late Middle Ages. )5. rowdy, spunky, sexy, and sensual dance and song popular in the New World that was banned repeatedly by upset officials. It is the oldest preserved African—American instrumental music. @ vocal category derived from Native American religious practise that was extremely devout and introspective. To this day, cumbés are performed in chapels in New Mexico and southern Arizona on Indian reservations. 40. A sung musical drama with costumes and scenery, based on a secular topic (such as a Greek lay) with orchestral accompaniment is a(n) » ‘ opera B. suite C. concerto D. oratorio E. sonata 41. The "vernacular" is another wo for anything that is A. religious, sacred, or holy B "regular" such as every-day language C. written in Latin \q D. irritating and distressing E. vocal as opposed to instrumental 42. A composer born in the New World who distinguished himself as a magnificent Church composer and was the first person born in the Americas to co ose an opera was (1 A. William Billings B. Lorenzo da Ponte anuel de Sumaya D. Luis Milan E. Carlos Chave 43. Of the following, who was a central figure in the twelfth century as a musician, dramatist, Q} astronomer, physicist, poet, philosopher d political advisor? A. Bardi B. Goethe @urcell D. Artusi E. Hildegard 44. If there is an alternation in style where one person sings, followed by a group, followed by the single person again, who is then answered by the group—and this continues—then the 3 performance style could best be described as A. neumatic B. syllabic C. antiphonal esponsorial E. atonal 45. Leonin and Perotin are important in that they A. offered a rebuttal to the nasty attack by Vivaldi in the press against Perotin's at the Council of Trent . B. were the founders of the ritornello in the middle of the Ars Nova. They were the first . composers to write specifically for the piano. ‘ C. Were the first to notate music that was clearly rhythmic; their works are associated with the Notre Dame School in the late Middle Ages. D. were the culmination of the Counter-Reformation in France after Albert of Brandenburg's untimely death. They are responsible for banning all music-making from worship (a decree that was soon overturned with the ascent of Gabrieli as Pope). E. are generally credited as being the composers for almost all Gregorian chant. In paintings they are usually pictured with the other “Church Doctors”—St. Augustine and St. Jerome. LISTENING 46. Te following piece is probably from a(n) @ madrigal by Weelkes B. fugue by Bach a D. Chorale by Martin Luther C. mass setting by Artusi E. sonata by Machaut "_ 47. This excerpt from the “Alleluia: Vidimus stellam” from the Listening CDs is representative f the musical concepts fiopera and oratorio Xkritornello and syllabic E. fugue and Chorale 48. The following excerpt is most likely an excerpt from a(n) A. concerto by Vivaldi B mass by Bach (J D. suite by Hildegard 49. The following excerpt is probably from . Josquin’s Ave Maria Nadi’s Notre Dame Mass m . ach’s 0 sucessores 50. The two following passages are probably from A. Handel’s Messiah \B\Hildegard’s Primavera D. Bach’s Wachet auf O recitative and aria melismatic and responsorial ratorio by Handel E. sonata by J osquin C. Handel’s Messiah B‘Hildegard’s Primavera ©Monteverdi’s Otfeo RHildegard’s Notre Dame Mass ...
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This homework help was uploaded on 02/07/2008 for the course MU 121 taught by Professor Russel during the Fall '00 term at Cal Poly.

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Russel Fall2000 ExamII Music MU121 - MUl’ZS—Ol Music...

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