The Industrial City

The Industrial City - Paul Sardias Notes: The Industrial...

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Paul Sardiñas Notes: The Industrial City American Urbanism The United States Census Department made a momentous announcement in 1920. More Americans lived in cities than in rural areas. Urban growth in the United States had proceeded at a remarkable pace throughout the nineteenth century. Rates of urban population growth had been highest in the years before the Civil War (1861-1865) New York’s population alone had reached 3.4 million by 1900, while newer industrial cities like Cleveland, Detroit, and Pittsburgh saw their populations grow to roughly 500,000. Most remarkable of all, Chicago, which had been little more than a provincial trading post in 1840, had become a thriving, crowded city of 1.7 million souls by 1900, surpassing Philadelphia as the nation’s second largest city. Between 1870 and 1914 that immigrant stream became a veritable flood, originating now from the nations of southern and Eastern Europe. Russia, Poland, Italy, and Hungary replaced England, Germany, and Scandinavia
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The Industrial City - Paul Sardias Notes: The Industrial...

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