Clash of Cultures 1910s V.S. 1920s

Clash of Cultures 1910s V.S. 1920s - Paul Sardias Clash of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Paul Sardiñas Clash of Cultures 1910s V.S. 1920s From colonial times until present, Americans have had to peculiar ability to look backward and forward at the same time. Tradition and progress have stood side-by-side in the American mind. Prohibition evolved into a program designed for the most part to eliminate from the urban scene the “immigrant salon,’ and thus the vises associated with that institution (prostitution, gambling, corruption) Volstead Act: Introduced by Andrew J. Volstead, this 1919 act of Congress implemented the Eighteenth Amendment which made it illegal to manufacture, transport or distribute alcoholic beverages and ushered in the age of Prohibition. Eighteenth Amendment: Ratified in 1919, this amendment authorized Congress to prohibit the manufacture, sale, and/or transportation of liquor. It was repealed in 1933 by the 21st amendment. At the time, typical middle-class Americans did not drink, except sometimes wine. Respectable men were careful about being seen in or about a saloon. The
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course HIST amh 1020 taught by Professor Seiler during the Spring '08 term at Hillsborough.

Page1 / 2

Clash of Cultures 1910s V.S. 1920s - Paul Sardias Clash of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online