Women and Body Image: An Analysis of "Anorexic" and "Homage to My Hips"

Women and Body Image: An Analysis of "Anorexic" and "Homage to My Hips"

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Women and Body Image: Analysis of “Anorexic” and “Homage to My Hips” Eavan Boland’s poem “Anorexic” and Lucille Clifton’s poem “Homage to My Hips” are very different from each other. Boland’s poem focuses on someone who is very unhappy with their body, to the point of trying to damage it beyond repair, while the speaker in Clifton’s poem embraces her body, curves and all. While the tones of the poems differ, the use of language and imagery helps to establish the fact that they cover the same topic; women’s body image, and they reveal different perspectives on women’s sense of self. Eavan Boland was born in Dublin in 1944. Growing up in London and New York City, Boland felt alienated from her Irish heritage, particularly in London, where she encountered prejudice against the Irish. She later returned to Dublin to attend school and published a pamphlet of poetry after her graduation. In 1966 she received degrees in English and Latin from Trinity and was hired by the English department as a lecturer. In a short time, however, she left Trinity and became a full-time literary critic and poet. Much of her early poetry focused on
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This essay was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course ENG 140 taught by Professor Graham during the Spring '08 term at Blackburn College.

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Women and Body Image: An Analysis of "Anorexic" and "Homage to My Hips"

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