ENGL Writing - Why People Need Writing Courses Why do...

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Why People Need Writing Courses? Why do students have to take writing courses in college? I could offer you a number of pragmatic reasons, such as it being the world's fundamental form of communication, it being the most efficient means of talking with ten or a 1000 individuals, or it being the best medium for relaying complex thoughts. Just for these reasons, students should master what I will call the craft of writing. Of course, other and possibly more compelling reasons exist. For the past decade, major U.S. employers have complained that recent college graduates, especially business majors, do not write well. Poor writing results in poorly communicated ideas,which slows business. In other words, too many of the nation's college graduates are transforming humankind's fastest and most cost efficient means of communication into one of itsmore inefficient and costly. If you can separate yourself from this stream of poor writers, you create an advantage for yourself during the hiring process and during your career—especially if you work in the fields of finance and accounting.Success in any career stems in part on how well an individual communicates her/his ideas, and that means writing because contrary to what you see on television and in the movies, business people want ideas in writing. Therefore, a well-communicated idea in a letter lands a recent college graduate a job interview. A concise email gets the writer a higher profile position in the company, leading to a higher salary. A well-written proposal lures investors for a project. I have seen this payoff. Two millionaires—one majored in psychology and the other in chemistry—earned their wealth in part because of their ability to write effectively and to convince investors of the viability of their ideas. Good writing skills also have fostered the careers of insurance investigators, land developers, telecommunications executives, and financial executives—all of whom I know as friends. They write well because they learned the most important lesson when itcomes to writing: No reader cares about what anyone writes. The reader cares only about what he gets from the email, letter, proposal, or report. These executives have learned that writing is not just putting their thoughts on paper. Writing—whether electronically or in print—convinces a stranger of the value of ideas using details (facts)and logic. For example, a writer may claim an idea important, but that does not make it so. The writer must convince the reader with details and logic. Think about the act of writing. Rarely do we write for ourselves. We write to communicate with others. Now, think about the act of reading. We do it in isolation—at least in the sense that we do not engage with others while reading. We must concentrate because neurologically reading does not come naturally to any one, as you will find out later. We must think about the ideas presented. Since we put so much work into reading, we demand a great deal from the writer.
Readers now expect the same from you because you have entered adulthood. Therefore, every

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