Jane Eyre Lecture Notes - DUALISM 1. The condition or state...

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DUALISM1. The condition or state of being dual or consisting of two parts; two-fold division; duality.(Oxford EnglishDictionary)[1] Literal Pairings[re. two wives] “It simply consists in theexistence of a previous marriage: Mr. Rochesterhas a wife now living.”(Chap 26; p. 289)[re. Bertha Mason]”[Bertha is] Jane’s truest and darkest double. . . the ferocious secret selfJane has been trying to repress.” (Gilbert and Gugar, p. 360)[re. Amy and Louisa Eshton]Both sisters were as fair as lilies.” (Chap 17; p. 171)[re. Blanche and Mary Ingram] “Blanche and Mary wereof equal stature,---straightand tall as poplars.” (Chap 17; p. 172)[re. Eshtons] “Amy and Louisa return to your nests like a pair of doves, as you are.” (Chap 20;p. 207)[re. Georgiana and Eliza Reed] “Ineach of the sisters there was one trait of themother---and only one.” (Chap 21; p. 228)[re. Diana and Mary Rivers] “Both were fair complexioned and slenderly made; bothpossessed faces full of distinction and intelligence.” (Chap 28; p. 334)[re. Grace Poole and Bertha Mason] “Good-morrow, Mrs. Poole!” said Mr. Rochester. “How areyou? and how is your charge to-day?” “We’re tolerable, sir, I thank you,” replied Grace, liftingthe boiling mess carefully on to the hob: “rather snappish, but not ’rageous.” (Chap 26; p. 293)[2] Jane Eyre’smirroring (reflections and seeing herself [Jane])·[John Reed]Now I'll teach you to rummage my book-shelves: for theyaremine; all the housebelongs to me, or will do in a few years. Go and stand by the door, out of the way of the mirror
and the windows.” (Chap 1; p. 11)·[the red room]My seat, to which Bessie and the bitter Miss Abbot had left me riveted, was alow ottoman near the marble chimney-piece; the bed rose before me; to my right hand therewas the high, dark wardrobe, with subdued, broken reflections varying the gloss of its panels;to my left were the muffled windows; a great looking-glass between them repeated the vacantmajesty of the bed and room. I was not quite sure whether they had locked the door; and whenI dared move, I got up and went to see. Alas! yes: no jail was ever more secure. Returning, Ihad to cross before the looking-glass; my fascinated glance involuntarily explored the depth itrevealed. All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality; and the strangelittle figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glitteringeyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit; I thought it like one ofthe tinyphantoms, half fairy, half imp, Bessie’s evening stories represented as coming out oflone, ferny dells in moors, and appearing before the eyes of belated travelers.” (Chap 2; p. 14)·[drawing room at Thornfield] “the ornaments on the pale Parian mantel-piece were ofsparkling Bohemian glass, ruby red; and between the windows large mirrors repeated thegeneral blending of snow andfire.” (Chap 11; p. 104)·[Rochester as fortune teller

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