phys132-24 exam2 winter05 - PHYSICS 132-24 Exam 11 Winter...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: PHYSICS 132-24 Exam 11, Winter 2005 NAM- L. , Part 1: Short Answer (Answer and explain in one or two sentences. Include a sketch or equation where appropriate.) Each question is worth 5 points. 1. Ignoring diffraction effects, sketch the intensity distribution pattern expected in a double slit interference experiment using a slit separation d and wavelength A. Plot the intensity on the ordinate axis and sin 0 on the abscissa, where 0 is the angle of observation. Clearly label the axes and indicate the values on the abscissa at which the maximums and minimums occur. 2. If a single slit diffraction experiment were first performed in air, then repeated under water, what change, if any, would occur in the observed intensity pattern? 3. Why are diffiaction efi‘ects normally heard, but not normally seen? 4. What is Huygen’s principle, W? Part II: Multiple Choice. Circle the letter of the one best answer to each of the following questions. Each question is worth 5 points. total internal reflection (a) must occur if vl< v2; (b) must occur if n1< n2; (c) may occur if 4’ / 1. If light traveling in medium 1 is incident at an angle on a boundary separating medium 1 from = ' (/‘f occur if n1>n2; (e) not enough info 2. A real object is placed a distance In front of a double convex thin lens of focal length f, and an image is formed. The image w' lb (a) cal and erect only if it is larger than the object; (b) real only if it is smaller than the [email protected]' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' none of these. 3. Ignoring diffraction effects, if the separation between the two slits in a double slit exp ' doubled and the wavelength is halved, the interfer nce fringes will (a) spread farther - p - closer together; (c) remain in place; (d) change ut not enough information is given to kno w none of these. 4. Two spheres, A and B, have the same size and are released simultaneously from the same height. Sphere A is denser than sphere B. T ' ; into consideration the presence of air, and assuming the air resistance to be the same on eac (6v . . ere A will reach the ground first; (b) sphere B will reach the ground first; (c) both spheres will “a the ground at the same time; (d) all of the above are possible; (6) none of these. Part III: Problem Solving. Work each of the following problems. Show your work. Credit for your answers depends on the quality of your explanations. Each problem is worth 20 points. 1. Light of wavelength 500 nm illuminates two slits separated by 0.30 mm. What is the distance betwee the 2“d and 3rd order dark fringes if the observing screen is placed 1.8 m from the slits? ? 3 M m ( 2. A lens produces a virtual image, enlarged four times and located 16 cm in front of the lens (on the same side as the object). (a) What is ' ' ' to illustrate your answers. 3. A hollow iron spherical shell floats almost completely submerged in water. If the outer e er is 1.0 m and the density of iron is 7.8 x 103 kg/m3, find the inner diameter. The density of water is 103 kg/mS; the volume of a sphere is (4/3)1tR3. hw—w-m , d 3 O .5? §§ M i W 1E PQH' M MW 4-» sec. ’Rmem; V4“) 6”““H 5759'} ML» 0 7 5 {afiM'vaQA} amtk MM‘>‘P0/fl 5H+§ of? 414% 57%.?" dOfl‘l momma“; U151- }m Y‘a‘h/‘IQ. 9‘5 emsflv' 1% MM lid—base, . ,fl ' , «‘1' d‘k‘QC/Cflm 5 mm SOL/«m 5, wafi 3‘44“ Sm ‘" 4" QW ‘ (m; L ‘ M065; 91/273 / 3014M sewals '7LrL—icipj GVDHHA (°r"‘-Cf5’) /——"’ K p :1: M [(59% doesn‘ \— (WM-7) / . W", we... mmmuqm-Wn 5 LA ’39 _ '24 91mg 2 ’1 v. Wagon“: 'Pflncwh srf-ufig 4%“ 4m “”5010? “(WAR \§ eiV‘“! 4°41“: C‘flbh J y\ >52 (+1'qm_ \_/ 7. M” J pv‘s’f‘fincfi ' A. ’\ M (m 7 . 7;- ; (“WM ” «m g 2, . w. 9 go a; 0‘ 00—7) M ' ”1 \ (500 W O ‘C'KQQQEQ 6 =3 )( ”féiEwo-me ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern