DAX - Englehardt argues that in cases such as cowarts, we...

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Englehardt argues that in cases such as cowarts, we ought to respect the “patient’s request to refuse lifesaving therapy even if one has good reason to believe that later the patient might change his/her mind” what argument does he give for this conclusion? Is it convincing? Why/why not? About thirty years ago, Dax Cowart was severely burned in a freak accident involving propane which burnt sixty-five percent of his body and killed his father. Today Dax’s accident and the aftermath illustrate the complex issues of autonomy, paternalism, and the quality of life. Dax’s recovery was not an easy one; he was not allowed to take responsibilities for his own actions and decisions. The accident caused a deep depression and Dax established a very pessimistic view of a life being that he didn’t want to live. The months following his accident, Dax was treated by doctors against his will. In a case such as Dax’s we should respect the patient’s request to refuse lifesaving therapy, only if the patient is proven to be competent to make such a decision. Some doctor’s argue that a patient isn’t able to make such a decision regarding their own life due to a large amount of pain, or the amount of medication they are taking to ease the pain. This isn’t true as long as the patient is proven to be competent. Dax was proven to be competent to make such a decision by Robert B. White and another psychiatrist to have a second opinion. Dr. White was brought in to declare Dax as mentally incapable to make such a vital decision, but he was still forced to stay in the hospital and was not allowed to make a competent decision. I believe it is permissible to force treatment on patients such as Dax in the beginning to alleviate the amount of pain, but afterward nothing should be forced if the patient can be proven to be mentally
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DAX - Englehardt argues that in cases such as cowarts, we...

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