The Natural History of Human Gait and Posture � Spine and Pelvis

The Natural History of Human Gait and Posture � Spine and Pelvis

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The Natural History of Human Gait and Posture – Spine and Pelvis Article by C. Owen Lovejoy Response by Tyson Gersh In his paper, C. Owen Lovejoy argues that homo sapiens have evolved an unusually efficient stride, or gait. Homo sapiens and their ancestors are unique, in that they are the only known species to have adopted bipedalism as their exclusive form of locomotion. Lovejoy, according to his paper, finds this odd due to the nature of evolution. Apparently, evolution would not have actively selected for calm strolling. Instead, Lovejoy claims that it was running or jogging that were selected for. A hominid more efficient at running or jogging would have an advantage in escaping predators and journey across a rough terrain filled with holes, pits, or cracks, thus promoting, thus promoting their fitness. As a byproduct of nature selecting for a species capable/efficient at running and jogging, hominids became very efficient walkers. Lovejoy suggests that the vast majority of research and examination of the human body,
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course ANTHRBIO 564 taught by Professor Wolpoff during the Spring '08 term at University of Michigan.

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