Issues, Principles and Attitudes

2 11 ii concur government tends to be reactive

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Unformatted text preview: ipating in fire, ambulance, Red Cross, etc. is continuing in a downward spiral. Along with working a full-time job and volunteering some time, there are added NIMS training requirements that are adding to decreased participation. Grants (research, application, and administration) are consuming a large portion of time. 2-7 Concur ~ 2-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Somewhat Concur ~ Again, NIMS is a construct that can change, as will the trends and outlooks (with any new administration in DC). Staffing (including grant management) and training go to the inadequate funding issues. I think decreasing participation of volunteers is more a function of the demographics than interest. 2-11 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 64 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University Concur ~ Staffing for emergency management may have decreased, but there have been large staffing increases in the HS arena. State departments of Homeland security, bioterrorism and agriterrorism are staffed where they never existed before. This has drawn from the pool of EM professionals and in some cases are drawing resources and conflicting with emergency management. 2-12 II Is our work truly making a difference in the communities we serve (improving preparedness, mitigation and response)? How do we best manage expectations within the resources we have? Expectations of the public, our elected officials, and the agencies we work with. How do we make EM a bigger priority for governments, policy makers, etc. 2-8 Concur ~ 2-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 2-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ "manage expectations within the resources" this is a crux issue!! 2-11 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ Government tends to be reactive in nature. Problems are addressed if they arise. Given current demands placed on local government from state and federal mandates, for many issues, not just emergency management, local officials have little time to focus on emergency management priorities. 2-12 II 1. Funding 2. Adequate staffing and support from elected/executive officials 3. Public/Home awareness and preparedness or personal responsibility to prepare 4. Emergency Management/Business Continuity educated career professionals 5. Coordination of public and private sectors in joint preparedness and response to ensure community resilience 6 Keeping the focus on the all-hazards approach, while addressing the unique aspects of specific hazards. 2-9 Concur ~ 2-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ Public-private coordination is going to be vital to resources management. 2-11 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 2-12 II 65 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University The most important issue presently before our profession involves adequate funding, adequate staff and most important recognition of the profession as a whole, both by the current and future White House Administration and by the public at large. 2-10 Concur ~ 2-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 2-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ Says it all very nicely. 2-11 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 2-12 II 1) Acceptance and credibility with policy makers/top administration; 2) Being recognized as professionals; 3) Lack of funding to implement the full range of acknowledged emergency management principles; 4) Recognition of the vital role of mitigation in protecting lives and property and stemming economic losses from disasters; 5) Vying with Homeland Security for funds, resources, recognition. 2-11 Concur ~ 2-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 2-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 2-12 II 1. Obtaining executive/political support from the elected/appointed powers in their jurisdiction so that their program is accepted, implemented and endorsed. 2. Understanding the threat facing their jurisdiction and with the assistance of the local and mutual aid entities, developing a comprehensive plan that addresses threat reduction, response integration and recovery issues. 3. Providing training (to include exercises) to the executive, operational and support elements of the response community. 4. To educate the population at risk to the hazards and potential threats the community faces. What to do should these hazards threaten and why to do it. What not to do and why. 66 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University 5. Have an understanding of the needs each of the management and response elements have with respect to emergency management. 2-12 Concur ~ 2-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 2-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ One need for all EM program is understanding the needs of all parts of the entity, how they interact with each other and how they interact with the program. 2-11 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Somewhat Concur ~ 2-12 II All-hazards comprehensive emerg...
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course EM EM-2212-26 taught by Professor Arlenemacgregor during the Spring '08 term at Mass Maritime.

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