Issues, Principles and Attitudes

Issues Principles and Attitudes

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Unformatted text preview: ative that emergency managers plan for all types of emergencies and disasters, and be ready to perform any function necessary. Collaborative approach Emergency managers must work with all pertinent individuals and organizations including the public, private and non-profit sectors and citizens in general. Prevention An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure. Preparedness You must be ready for the expected and unexpected (see Kreps 1991). Improvisation You must be willing and able to adapt and be flexible (see Kreps 1991 or Kendra's work). There is also a need to shift emphasis on hazards toward the concept of vulnerability. Many books, including Disasters by Design, What is a Disaster?, Handbook of Disaster Research, are calling for a change in thinking and increased emphasis on vulnerability. This is because we cannot always control hazards, but we can determine our level of vulnerability to the hazards. Many people suggest that vulnerability is a greater determinant of disasters than hazards themselves. 1-10 Somewhat Concur ~ An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure, but we can't prevent everything (as pointed out in the last item above) and we need to be ready to respond, recover and restore. We are over emphasizing vulnerability reduction and immediate response at the expense of resiliency and the resources, organization and commitment to recovery and restoration. 1-3 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 45 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University Concur ~ I agree with all of this (except that I see prevention as one possible outcome of a broader mitigation strategy). 1-4 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-8 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-11 II In articulating the fundamental principles of emergency management within NZ it is important to point out that these principles apply to all New Zealanders as emergency management stakeholders. In addition there are key agencies that have an explicit role in supporting NZ through emergency management arrangements Principles: 6. Individual and community responsibility and self reliance; Individuals and communities are ultimately responsible for their safety and the security of their livelihoods. 7. A transparent and systematic approach to managing the risks from hazards; Communities must be given a say in what levels of risk they consider acceptable and what measures are put in place to manage those risks. Comprehensive and integrated hazard risk management; Means dealing with the risks associated with all our hazards both natural and manmade, through risk reduction, readiness, response and recovery. Addressing the consequences of hazards; Focusing on consequences provides a basis for planning informs decision making and enables more effective action through improved prioritization and resource allocation. Making best use of information, expertise and structures. Making best use of information, as well as improving both information systems and the applicability of research is crucial. 1-11. 8. 9. 10. Concur ~ The statements above capture the essence of comprehensive emergency management. 1-3 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~NZ has gone further than any other country to model its emergency management system on what should be rather than what has been and deserves more attention.1-4 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-7 II 46 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-8 I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-9 II Inclusiveness, community base, bottom-up development based on the local level (but with harmonisation provided by national and regional levels. A civil protection approach, all hazards planning and management. Well-developed generic emergency plans. 1-12 Concur ~ 1-3 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~The focus here on community is critical. 1-4 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-8 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-11 II Q1C: What do you believe, if anything is lacking in the discussion of what the guiding principles of emergency management should be at the county, state and federal government level? First and foremost is the `buy-in', the involvement, implementation, and the follow through from those in charge on a constant basis, not through extemporization. 1-1 Concur ~ 1-3 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ Politics again. 1-8 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-9 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ 1-11 II In many cases there is no discussion, just one way communication from the top down. 1-3 Concur ~ 1-7 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Concur ~ EM MUST be an organic, de-bureaucratized discipline to succeed. 1-8 II ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 47 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consul...
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course EM EM-2212-26 taught by Professor Arlenemacgregor during the Spring '08 term at Mass Maritime.

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