Issues, Principles and Attitudes

6 emergency management requires the involvement of

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Unformatted text preview: fferent types of hazards. 2. We can determine our vulnerability (but cannot always control hazards). 3. Addressing vulnerability requires an acceptance of the multi-causality and complexity of disasters. 4. It is best to be engaged in prevention activities. 5. Because we cannot prevent or anticipate everything, we must be prepared and be willing to improvise. 6. Emergency management requires the involvement of all sectors (public, private and nonprofit) and citizens as well." 1-10 15 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Colloquially: 1) Disasters have always happened. 2) Disasters will continue to happen. 3) Disasters create chaos. 4) Communities will seek to control chaos, one way or another. Seriously: 1) Emergency management is an all hazards concept. 2) It includes all phases: prepare, respond, recovery, mitigate. 3) It works when we understand that all phases are interdependent on the others. 4) We have to institutionalize emergency management concepts through integration of all four phases throughout the community. 5) We do that by creating partnerships through coordination and collaboration." 2-11 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "In articulating the fundamental principles of emergency management within NZ it is important to point out that these principles apply to all New Zealanders as emergency management stakeholders. In addition there are key agencies that have an explicit role in supporting NZ through emergency management arrangements. Principles: 1. Individual and community responsibility and self reliance; Individuals and communities are ultimately responsible for their safety and the security of their livelihoods. 2. A transparent and systematic approach to managing the risks from hazards; Communities must be given a say in what levels of risk they consider acceptable and what measures are put in place to manage those risks. 3. Comprehensive and integrated hazard risk management; Means dealing with the risks associated with all our hazards both natural and manmade, through risk reduction, readiness, response and recovery. 4. Addressing the consequences of hazards; Focusing on consequences provides a basis for planning, informs decision making and enables more effective action through improved prioritization and resource allocation. 5. Making best use of information, expertise and structures. Making best use of information, as well as improving both information systems and the applicability of research is crucial." 1-11. The eight principles that the Emergency Management Roundtable group came to consensus on are supplied below with their brief definitions followed by excerpted comments from practitioners. For those interested in a more direct and less verbose summary see Appendix C for Blanchard's consolidation of the Phase I narrative data by themes. Comprehensive- emergency managers consider and take into account all hazards, all phases, all stakeholders and all impacts relevant to disasters. 16 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University "The base principle is to continue the discussion for a comprehensive emergency management program that involves all phases, for all disciplines, for all hazards, for life safety and property protection." 3-5 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "All levels of Government recognition of the all hazards approach and appropriately funding activities across all phases in a concerted way". 3-4 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Emergency management requires the involvement of all sectors (public, private and nonprofit) and citizens as well." 1-10 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Involve all officials, disciplines, public and private sectors, and the public." 2-5 Progressive - emergency managers anticipate future disasters and take preventive and preparatory measures to build disaster-resistant and disaster-resilient communities. "Mitigation invest in doing the "right thing" with land use planning, building code enforcement of codes and standards, insurance." 2-3 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Community resilience and mitigation are core concepts that have dropped from the federal agenda so even if a local wants to engage in them they will label it "education" or something else. This is only an example of how hard it is for those practitioners wanting to be proactive to do so if an issue or topic is not on the federal agenda." 3-8 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "The idea that the sacrifice made in the name of prevention now will significantly reduce losses in the future."3-5 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Planning can and does make a difference." 2-8 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Holistic community preparedness with more than the basic infrastructure involved." 2-5 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "Mus...
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course EM EM-2212-26 taught by Professor Arlenemacgregor during the Spring '08 term at Mass Maritime.

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