Issues, Principles and Attitudes

Issues Principles and Attitudes

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Unformatted text preview: regulating; the development of clearer emergency management `best practices'...(14); Making best use of information, expertise and structures. Making best use of information, as well as improving both information systems and the applicability of research is crucial (1-11); One area that I believe could use some definition is what we expect an emergency manager to know i.e. what constitutes our specialized body of knowledge as a profession. I would argue that this specialized body consists of three parts: 1) a knowledge of historical disasters, both local and national/international, 2) a knowledge of social science literature related to disasters, and 3) technical knowledge related to emergency management, e.g. the Stafford Act, NIMS, etc. All of this is supported by nonspecialized knowledge such as general management and risk management principles (3-7). Reconstruction (1-5) Recovery (1-5, 2-1, 2-4, 2-6); Making sure that recovery efforts address needs for mitigation so the same problem does not persist (1-6) Response (1-5, 2-1, 2-2, 2-4, 2-6, 2-12); Coordination of responders this requires knowledge of how organizations work (the various organizations that respond to disasters) knowing how/having skills to facilitate coordination (1-6) Risk Assessment (1-8) -- Emergency Management is fundamentally the linchpin of coordination in hazards analysis, vulnerability and capability assessment (1-1); Know the risks and vulnerabilities (2-5); Analysis of the critical threats facing the community with regard to vulnerability and risk (2-12) ; Planning and preparedness (including risk assessment is also a moral obligation in the profession thus a principle (1-6); Addressing the consequences of hazards; Focusing on consequences provides a basis for planning, informs decision making and enables more effective action through improved prioritization and resource allocation (1-11); Plan for the most effective use of resources as defined by a sound risk assessment for those you serve (3-9). Risk-Based or Risk Management Approach -- Comprehensive and integrated hazard risk management; Means dealing with the risks associated with all our hazards both natural and man-made, through risk reduction, readiness, response and recovery (1-11); Essentially, emergency management must be seen as a mechanism by which the community manages 107 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University risk. Consequently, emergency management must be based on risk management principles: identification of hazards and vulnerabilities, analysis of risk, etc. (3-7). Social Vulnerability -- The Most Vulnerable Segments of Society Require Special Attention -Disasters Impact Differentially (BWB); The ability to identify, understand and respond to the requirements of special needs populations in the community (1-3); An all-hazards all people approach that considers the interaction and interdependence of the full range of potential triggers with the dynamic set of determinants of vulnerability (1-4); There is also a need to shift emphasis on hazards toward the concept of vulnerability. Many books, including Disasters by Design, What is a Disaster?, Handbook of Disaster Research, are calling for a change in thinking and increased emphasis on vulnerability. This is because we cannot always control hazards, but we can determine our level of vulnerability to the hazards. Many people suggest that vulnerability is a greater determinant of disasters than hazards themselves. 1-10; Protect the weakest members of the community first (3-9). Staffing (1-2) Training and Exercising (1-9) -- Emergency Management is fundamentally the linchpin of coordination in hazards analysis, vulnerability and capability assessment, planning, preparing, followed by appropriate education, training, and exercise (1-1); Equipping, training, exercising, and critiquing are just as important as planning and staffing (1-2); Train and rehearse find shortfalls and continually work to be better prepared (2-5); Emergency Manager and First Responder Training and Exercises (2-7); Provide training to endorse and validate plans (2-12); We will always have disasters, natural, human-induced (accidental), human-induced (intentional). The threats grow greater in number and complexity, hence education and training to emergency managers should advance accordingly (3-10). 108 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University Numerical Listing of Emergency Management Principles 1. All Actors Collaboration, Coordination, Communicate, Build/Maintain Relationships -- 19 2. Preparedness -- 14 3. Mitigation -- 12 4. Four Phases Preparedness, Response, Mitigation, and Recovery 9 5. Planning -- 9 6. All-Hazards -- 8 7. Response 7 8. Risk Assessment -- 7 9. Training and Exercising -- 7 10. Building Culture of Disaster Preparedness - Essential Mission of Emergency Management 6 11. Integrated Emergency Management -- 6 12. Professionalism -- 6 13. Recovery -- 5 14. Emergency Management Is An Essential Government Function -- 4 15. Intergovernmental and Intra-governmental Structure Context -- 4 16. Social Vulnerability Approach Required -- 4 17. All Disasters Are Local First; bottom-up development -- 3 18. Building Disaster Resistant and Resilient Communities -- 3 19. Leadership -- 3 20. Management -- 3 21. Comprehensive Emergency Management -- 2 22. Customer Service Orientation -- 2 109 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University 23. Functional Approach -- 2 24. Inter or Multi-disciplinary -- 2 25. Preservation of Life, COG & essential services, protection of property/assets, public health/safety -- 2 26. Risk-Based or Risk Management Approach -- 2 27. All Disasters Are Different -- Thus One Size Will Not Fit All -- 1 28. Disasters Are A Fact Of Life -- 1 29. Disasters Are More Than Just Large Emergencies -- 1 30. Disasters Are Social Constructs -- 1 31. EM requires an understanding of local politics and their impact on resource allocation -- 1 32. Emergency Management Requires Self-Analysis and Critique -- 1 33. Improvisation -- 1 34. Nationwide System of Effective Disaster Response and Recovery -- 1 35. People don't respond to disasters the way they are portrayed in the media -- 1 36. Political and Social Context -- 1 37. Political leadership at the highest state/local government(s), private sector -- 1 38. Prioritization of planning efforts go after most likely hazards first -- 1 39. Reconstruction -- 1 40. Staffing -- 1 110 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University APPENDIX D From the Emergency Management Roundtable held March 5-6, 2007 at the Emergency Management Institute. Emergency Management Vision, Definition, Mission and Principles Definition Emergency management is the managerial function charged with creating the framework within which communities reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters. Mission To protect communities by coordinating and integrating all activities necessary to build, sustain, and improve the capability to mitigate against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from threatened or actual natural disasters, acts of terrorism, or other man-made disasters. Vision Safer, less vulnerable communities with the capacity to cope with hazards and disasters. Principles Comprehensive emergency managers consider and take into account all hazards, all phases, all stakeholders and all impacts relevant to disasters. Progressive emergency managers anticipate future disasters and take preventive and preparatory measures to build disaster-resistant and disaster-resilient communities. Risk-driven emergency managers utilize sound risk management principles: hazard identification, risk analysis, and impact analysis. Priorities and resources are assigned on the basis of this process. Integrated emergency managers are responsible for ensuring to the highest possible degree of unity of effort among all levels of government and all elements of a community. Collaboration emergency managers create and sustain broad and sincere relationships among individuals and organizations to encourage trust, advocate a team atmosphere, build consensus, and facilitate communication. Coordination emergency managers organize all relevant stakeholders with a common purpose. Flexibility emergency managers rely on creative and innovative approaches to solving disaster challenges. This is especially the case after disasters when pre-defined approaches may be inadequate to the situation at hand. Professionalism emergency managers value a science and knowledge-based approach based on education, training, experience, ethical practice, public stewardship and continuous improvement. 111 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University...
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course EM EM-2212-26 taught by Professor Arlenemacgregor during the Spring '08 term at Mass Maritime.

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