Issues, Principles and Attitudes

This means it must be integrated and

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Unformatted text preview: gnificantly influence this from within the community's broader decision-making systems (1-4) Emergency Management Is An Essential Government Service (1-8); Equipping (1-2); Give EM officials at all levels the tools and training they need to successfully do their jobs (3-6); An EM must be able to get all the support (assets, political, fiscal, etc) for the frontline responders to do their jobs most effectively and to fill the gaps when they are presented. If done correctly, EM should not even be noticed in the equation (3-8). Four Phases Preparedness, Response, Mitigation, and Recovery (1-8,1-9, 2-7, 2-11, 2-13, 3-2, 3-4, 3-9); A comprehensive approach that balances activities in mitigation (which includes prevention), preparedness (which includes planning, education, and resources), all aspects of response (not just life safety first responders) and short and long-term recovery (1-4) Functional Approach -- There are demands that are common to all emergencies/disasters/catastrophes, but there also are distinct demands of each type of hazard agent (1-2); Well-developed generic emergency plans (1-12) Improvisation You must be willing and able to adapt and be flexible (see Kreps 1991 or Kendra's work) (1-10) Inter or Multi-disciplinary -- Emergency managers must be willing to work with and learn from people in many different disciplines (physical, biological, and social sciences; engineering, planning, architecture, and medicine/public health (1-2); multidisciplinary (3-7) 105 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University Integrated Emergency Management -- An integrated approach (1-4, 3-4); We have to institutionalize emergency management concepts through integration of all four phases throughout the community (2-11); Partnerships (2-3); To be effective, emergency management must be perceived as adding value to the community it serves. This means it must be integrated and institutionalized with normal governmental mechanisms (3-7); Horizontal and Vertical Integration (BWB) Intergovernmental and Intra-governmental Structure Context (BWB); Emergency managers work in a federal system (1-2); An integrated approach that recognizes that risk (as generated by our hazards and vulnerability) and the impacts of specific events are the product of wider social processes that `emergency management' can only significantly influence this leverage the full resources in a community, in a State and the nation to build the strongest EM system possible (3-6); Many aspects of disaster are knowable and predictable. Far more needs to be done nationally to anticipate and prepare for hazards/disasters (3-10). Leadership (2-13, 3-6) The ability to manage and lead in complex and dynamic situations (1-3) Management (2-9); The ability to manage and lead in complex and dynamic situations (1-3); ...emergency management is about management. Emergency managers are generalists who must integrate the activities of numerous spets. This requires skills in strategic planning, meeting facilitation, etc. Emergency management must therefore be based on general management principles as well (3-7) Mitigation (1-2, 1-3, 1-5, 1-6, 2-1, 2-3, 2-6, 3-5, 3-6, 3-8) Reduce the threats (2-12); Prevention An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure (1-10) Nationwide System of Effective Disaster Response and Recovery (BWB) People (in and out of organizations) don't respond to disasters the way they are portrayed in the media (1-2) Planning (1-1, 1-9, 2-4, 2-5, 2-8, 2-12, 3-3, 3-4); Plan for the most effective use of resources as defined by a sound risk assessment for those you serve (3-9). Political and Social Context -- An integrated approach that recognizes that risk (as generated by our hazards and vulnerability) and the impacts of specific events are the product of wider social processes that `emergency management' can only significantly influence this from within the community's broader decision-making systems (1-4). Political leadership at the highest state/local government(s), private sector (2-3). Preparedness (1-1, 1-5, 1-6, 1-10, 2-1, 2-2, 2-3, 2-4, 2-5, 2-6, 3-3, 3-4, 3-6, 3-10). Preservation of life, continuance of government and essential services and the protection of 106 Issues, Principles And Attitudes Oh My! Examining Perceptions from Select Academics, Practitioners And Consultants on the Subject of Emergency Management Carol L. Cwiak, North Dakota State University property/assets. In that order (3-8); Above all things, serve the public health and safety above all concern for personal interest or career, Protect people and animals first, and then critical infrastructure needed to protect them, and finally the environment the people and animals live within. (3-9). Prioritization of planning efforts go after most likely hazards first (2-2). Professionalism (2-3, 2-6, BWB); a research driven, evidence-based `reflective practitioner' approach to emergency management (instead of the current lessons learned through random practice); the development of an emergency management profession (in the sense of a profession from a sociology of occupations perspective) that is education based and self...
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