Remember Remember the 5th of November

Remember Remember the 5th of November - Remember remember...

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Remember, remember the Fifth of November Bailey Eubanks Professor Kendrick FAS 1126
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Eubanks 1 “Remember, remember the Fifth of November, The Gunpowder Treason and Plot, I know of no reason, Why Gunpowder Treason, Should ever be forgot (V for Vendetta).” This famous quote from history arouses the thought of Guy Fawkes Night, a Roman conspirator who conspired to blow up the parliament buildings on November 5, 1605. This sole person inspired the film V for Vendetta, directed by James McTeigue. It is about a man who plots against the present totalitarian government. He does it for the benefit of the people by not only destroying parliament but destroying a corrupt government. McTeigue illustrates this film as a complex work of art. It is evident throughout the film where there are beautiful examples of mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound and editing. He uses each of these to their fullest potential in the concluding scene where “V” has just been killed and Evey Hammond, his now accomplice, finishes his plan which would include destroying parliament and uniting all the United Kingdom once again. In this extract from the film, mise-en-scene is an essential element that needs to be analyzed. In the opening shot, mise-en-scene is already at hand, where the characters Evee and V are together and it has come time for V’s immanent death. The close up between the two creates almost a mirror image of each other, where the placing of the faces looks as if it creates a pictorial V between them. The names Evee and V also have an irking similarity to them, to parallel to be true. This is where McTeigue demonstrates the common bond between the two and is essential in setting up the forethought that they might be in love. Another part of mise-en-scene McTeigue manifests, is the arrangement of the lighting. Lighting is necessary throughout the end sequence, where it is intimate between V and Evey. You then see the change in Evey as if she is learned past the point
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Eubanks 2 of conception, by carrying on V’s work . For example she quotes him saying “Inspector Finch, do you enjoy music, (V for Vendetta)” the exact line from the beginning of the movie where V asks her the same question, then after, the “Old Bailey” is destroyed but in Evey’s case, when she asks the inspector, it is Parliament that is destroyed. From what I see inside the film, McTeigue uses a lot of “side lighing” which helps develop the characters and exactly how they maybe feeling at the time. An example might be the sadness in Evey when V is dying or the determination in the people when they march
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Remember Remember the 5th of November - Remember remember...

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