Candide - Eubanks 1 Within the satire novel, Candide,...

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Eubanks 1 Within the satire novel, Candide, Volitare uses many thoughts and expressions, that he weaved the into the book incognito. These symbols and beliefs were revolutionary for the time Volitaire was living in. Intolerably, looked down upon by the government and much of society, his ideas opened minds and spread new ideas to the rest of the world. Volitare uses many evens and characters to express his views throughout the novel. Some of the major ingenious examples include, the pretense of religion, money and its corrupting power and how philosophical reasoning has its flaws. Each of these examples serves and a major point in coming full circle with the overall picture Volitare is trying to make known. It is not till later down the road that people realize his reasoning’s and right their wrongs. For the first example, in Candide, Volitare uses examples by criticizing religious institutions and their leaders. He does this effectively; an instance would be the grand inquisitor as a symbol for how religion can look on the outside but in side is corruption. The inquisitor was a priest who unfortunately could not obstain from sexual relations
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course HIS 1307 taught by Professor Gawrich during the Spring '08 term at Baylor.

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Candide - Eubanks 1 Within the satire novel, Candide,...

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