Percep. & Patt. Recog. (studt)

Percep. & Patt. Recog. (studt) - Perception Pattern...

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I. Modularity in the Pattern Recognition System A. Konorski’s (1967) Visual Recognition Taxonomy 0. Small, manipulable objects, ex. Cup -argued there was 9 modular objects 1. Larger, partially manipulable objects Ex. Desk 2. Non-manipulable objects Ex. house 3. Human faces Perception: recognizing a stimulus Pattern recognition: incoming stimulus compared to representation in memory  (comp. term) Pattern recognition has 3 classes – words, objects, face. o Objects has 2 sub-classes – living “animate”, non-living “inanimate”  (plants can’t move on their own.) 0. Emotional facial expressions 1. Animated objects ex. robots 2. Signs ex. Road signs 3. Handwriting 4. Positions of limbs B. Farah (1992) 5. 1. Domain-Specific Recognition Systems     0. Faces 0. Prosopagnosia – deficiency in recognizing faces 1. Objects 1. Agnosia 2. Words 2. Alexia – difficulty in writing words 2. Dissociations in Neuropsychology
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3. Holistic vs.Decompositional Processing 0. 0. Subjects taught to identify a set of faces + objects (e.g., houses) 1. When tested with a PART from objects (e.g., door of a house),  subjects better at recognizing than part of a face (e.g., nose)  2. Faces less decomposable than objects 4. Farah’s Conclusions 6. Face recognition is holistic 7. Word recognition is decompositional 8. Object recognition system shares strategies of both II. The Visual System A. The Eye 4. 5. Lens 6. Retina 0. Rods
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1. Cones 7. Bipolar Cells 8. Ganglion Cells 9. Optic Nerve 10. Optic Chiasm 11. Lateral Geniculate  Nucleaus (LGN) Left visual field to RH, they will be able to recognize it but won’t always be able to report  verbally what they are seeing. LGN – on the sides of the thalamus B. Primary Visual Cortex 9. On/Off Center Cells There are specific neurons in the PVC that are particular for lines or edges and they  either fire optimally when a line falls on a particular orientation. These cells are specific  to orientation, in a particular part of the visual field. For example: neuron’s orientation is  vertical. If it encounters a horizontal line, next to no firing, when it encounters a line  closer to vertical than horizontal, it fires somewhat, and when it encounters a line vertical  as well, it fires fully. V1 receptive fields: response of a simple cell 10. Feature Detectors/ Simple Cells, sensitive to ORIENTATION. Changing what its orientation or where it is in the VF will change the response.
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This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course CC 302 taught by Professor Galinsky during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas.

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Percep. & Patt. Recog. (studt) - Perception Pattern...

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