Contrast and Comparison of Operating Systems - Contrast and Comparison of Operating Systems Contrast and Comparison of Operating Systems Team B will

Contrast and Comparison of Operating Systems - Contrast and...

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Contrast and Comparison of Operating Systems Contrast and Comparison of Operating Systems Team B will take what we have learned from our course POS/355 Operating systems and research to compare and contrast the UNIX/Linux, Microsoft Windows, and MacOS systems. In particular we will contrast and compare the different operating systems in regards to memory management, processing, file management and security. Operating systems at the core is all about the kernel. The kernel in all of the operating systems is the main component that is responsible in the management of memory, processing, file management and security. Contrast and Comparison of Memory Management within Operating Systems Memory management in comparison and contrasts between the different operating systems is due to the way the kernel works in conjunction with the memory. Since each operating system has different kernel’s they each have similar and different ways that they manage memory. Contrasts and comparisons on Mac OS, Windows, and UNIX/Linux are described below. 1. UNIX: Though UNIX and Linux are extremely similar when it comes to how things work internally; there are slight differences that make UNIX distinct from its counterpart. One process that UNIX utilizes is known as swapping; this is done by moving chunks of the Virtual Memory (called pages), out of the main memory and moving others in. In order for this process to work at its best, those pages that are needed must be accessible in the Main Memory at the demand of the CPU. When a page is expected to be needed in the very near future it is termed a resident set. If the CPU attempts to access a page that is no longer available in the Main Memory, a page fault will occur, and the needed page will then have to be located, as the CPU waits for the swap to occur. These types of errors can occur due to memory allocation issues. The main purpose of the Memory Manager is to minimize the number of page faults that occur; though the swapping of memory seems like a performance impeding event, it is actually not. In actuality, when the performance becomes altered it is only due to the incidence of a page fault. In comparison to other operating systems, UNIX is quite different when it comes to managing its memory. The operating system uses extremely sophisticated memory management algorithms to make the best use of memory resources. One method of Memory Management used by UNIX is called Mapping. Mapping is defined when a segment of a files virtual memory is designated as corresponding to the contents of the given file. When the mapped file is accessed it is actually pulling data from the file itself. File mapping is primarily used for the loading of executable code or when a program is launched. One of the initial actions after this occurs is to map the program executable and all of its shared libraries into the newly created virtual memory space. There are a few versions of UNIX (and Linux) distributions that will let you see how this actually works by using trace, truss, or strace tools. One important thing to note about this

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