The Price - Kirsten Chen "The Price" Review Three...

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Kirsten Chen “The Price” Review Three p.m. rounds the bend, the curtains close, the lights turn on. .. and I stay right in my seat. This afternoon, I have watched as Victor and Walter Franz spiral into the past and are pummeled by memories from a time long ago. The moral intensity of the drama is balanced out by the comical relief provided by Gregory Solomon, and the play falls together in a wonderful display of colored emotion and vivid imagery from the past. It is soon realized that the title of the play provides for a double meaning. First, the audience gathers that the “The Price” reflects the price of the furniture and keepings within the Franz household- what Solomon is willing to pay, and what Victor and Walter each argue for. However, the thought of “The Price,” soon boils an argument for the price each human pays for his decisions in life. Victor, the brother who stayed with his father through mental depression, has become a local cop and married his wife Esther, but has never amounted to all he might
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The Price - Kirsten Chen "The Price" Review Three...

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