NYC City Active guidelines.pdf - ACTIVE DESIGN GUIDELINES...

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GUIDELINES DESIGN ACTIVE PROMOTING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH IN DESIGN
PROMOTING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH IN DESIGN ACTIVE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Michael R. Bloomberg mayor David Burney commissioner Department of Design and Construction Thomas Farley commissioner Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Janette Sadik-Khan commissioner Department of Transportation Amanda Burden commissioner Department of City Planning © 2010, City of New York All rights reserved.
A CT I V E D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS Commissioners’ Introduction 004 American Institute of Architects New York Introduction 005 Executive Summary 006 How to Use the Active Design Guidelines 008 Glossary of Symbols 009 Chapter 1 010 Environmental Design and Health: Past and Present Chapter 2 020 Urban Design: Creating an Active City Chapter 3 066 Building Design: Creating Opportunities for Daily Physical Activity Chapter 4 108 Synergies with Sustainable and Universal Design Appendix: LEED Physical Activity Innovation Credit 130 Photography Credits 133 Acknowledgments 134
A CT I V E D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S 4 The New York City Departments of Design and Construction (DDC), Health and Mental Hygiene, Transportation (DOT), and City Planning are proud to present the Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design. This publication complements other guidelines produced by the City of New York, such as the DDC’s series of handbooks for architects and urban designers and the DOT’s Street Design Manual . The Guidelines are also part of the vision of a more livable and hospitable NYC promoted in Mayor Bloomberg’s Design + Construction Excellence Initiative. The Active Design Guidelines are the City’s first publication to focus on designers’ role in tackling one of the most urgent health crises of our day: obesity and related diseases including diabetes. The Active Design Guidelines address those responsible for the planning and construction of buildings, streets, and neighborhoods. The publication seeks to educate designers about opportunities to increase daily physical activity, including measures such as making stairs more visible and providing inviting streetscapes for pedestrians and bicyclists. Several of these strategies are common sense; many are supported by academic research translated into practical recommendations. No single strategy alone will solve the obesity crisis. Implemented over a broad range of urban and architectural projects, however, these measures can contribute significantly toward bringing about healthier lifestyles in our communities. A number of the strategies in these guidelines can also reduce energy use in buildings, thereby benefiting the environment. The four principal city agencies named above have partnered with the Mayor’s Office of Management and Budget, the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (AIANY), and with members of the academic community in developing the Guidelines . Earlier drafts of the Guidelines were circulated widely for review among

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