Exam2StudyGuide - Chapter 6 Motivation and Emotion Sleep...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 6 Motivation and Emotion Sleep Sleep is a motivated behavior Why do we sleep? Is it due to changes in light? (day/night cycle) Sleep Regulation Highly regulated behaviour Time Deprivation Studies - Free Running Sleep Regulation Follow a 25 hour cycle (circadian rhythm) day/night cycle "entrains" us to 24 hour cycle Light activates the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) What is the function of sleep? Not well understood. Best answer: it makes us feel better the next day One method for assessing the function of sleep: sleep deprivation Sleep Deprivation Studies Problem: Keeping subject awake confounds effect of staying awake (e.g. increased stress) Rats: sleep deprived rats died or became sick, stomach ulcers Sleep Deprivation Studies “Common" findings in humans : hallucinations paranoia increased appetite and sex drive decreased performance on cognitive tasks decreased motivation decreased creativity severe sleepiness Individual differences are large Sleep Deprivation - Case Studies Peter Tripp (1959) Disk Jockey stayed awake for 200 hours showed microsleeps (2-3 sec) experienced hallucinations and paranoia eventually taken away in a straight jacket
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sleep Deprivation - Case Studies Randy Gardner (1970) played pinball for 264 hours not well-tested, but no apparent problems Current general view: long-term sleep deprivation’s biggest effect is to make one want to fall asleep Theories of Purpose of Sleep Body Restoration Theory need "down time" to fix things up but, often brain is more active asleep than awake Preservation & Protection Theory Sleep as an adaptive response keeps us from wandering around at night. Measuring Sleep 1. Electroencephalogram (EEG) brain electrical activity (overall) 2. Electro-oculogram (EOG) eye movements 3. Autonomic measures Heart Rate, Blood Pressure, EMG of muscles Recording an EEG An electroencephalogram is a visual recording of voltage changes in the brain. Stages of Sleep Awake Beta waves: alert wakefulness fast frequency EEG, eye-movements, muscle tension Alpha waves: relaxed wakefulness EEG slower, synchronised slower eye-movements, muscles relaxed EEG - Awake Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) stages of sleep NREM stage 1: EEG slower slow eye-movements muscle tension absent 10 min duration "light sleep" - weird thoughts Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) stages of sleep NREM stage 2:
Background image of page 2
no eye movements see "sleep spindles" on EEG Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) stages of sleep NREM stage 3-4: “deep” Sleep large, slow EEG - synchronous brain activity difficult to awaken Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep “wakeful” EEG rapid eye movements increased pulse, blood pressure
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Symmons during the Fall '07 term at Western Washington.

Page1 / 13

Exam2StudyGuide - Chapter 6 Motivation and Emotion Sleep...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online