8Sensation08

8Sensation08 - Sensation: The construction of reality...

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Sensation: The construction of reality
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Sensation: The construction of “reality” I. Sensation Defined a. What is “sensation?” b. Stages of sensory processing II. Come to your senses! a. Touch b. Taste c. Smell d. Hearing e. Pain f. Vision III. Visual Sensation
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What is Sensation? The process by which sense organs gather information about the environment and transmit it to the brain.
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Same problem for each sense Transforming the energy in the world, that is a sensation, into a signal that the brain can understand Sense Environmental Information Vision ---------> Photons Hearing -------->Sound waves Smell ----------->Airborne chemicals
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Stages of Sensation I. Stimulation II. Transduction III. Transmission in the brain
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Transduction: To transform physical stimuli in the environment into neural signals in the brain Example (Hearing): Sound waves are transformed into vibrations in the ear, and the strength of those vibrations are coded by sensory neurons Stages of Sensation
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How many Senses? There are 6 major senses: touch taste smell hearing pain vision Vision has been studied most extensively
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Touch -Pressure -Warmth -Cold Touch includes 3 main sensations. .
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Touch Receptors are the sensory neurons
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Taste Bitter Salty Sweet Sour Five Main Taste Sensations Umami
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True or False: Receptors are in differ areas of the tongue, as shown below? False: Taste receptors are distributed evenly throughout the tongue
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Tastebuds--the taste receptors Only 2/3 are on the tongue Most people have 2000 to 10,000 taste buds Each bud contains 50 to 150 taste receptor cells Send information to the Gustatory sensory neurons
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Smell Chemical receptors in the nose
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The Role of Smell in “Taste”
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Odor Identification in Men and Women
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Sound: 2 Key Characteristics Frequency of a sound wave is related to the pitch of a sound Amplitude of a sound wave is related to loudness of a sound Greatest compression of molecules Least compression of molecules One cycle Amplitude Higher amplitude (Louder) Lower amplitude (Softer) Higher frequency (Higher pitch) Lower frequency (Lower pitch) (a) (b)
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8Sensation08 - Sensation: The construction of reality...

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