10Attention08 - Attention Dangers of the limits of...

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    Attention
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    Dangers of the limits of attention?
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    Attention • Some aspects of our perception are under our  conscious attentive control. • Example:  In a large crowd, we can concentrate on  listening to some people and ignoring others. • However, other perceptual processes occur  automatically and we cannot consciously control  them.
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    Automatic Processes: The Stroop Effect • Some abilities which once required attention  can become automatic through practice. • An example of such learned automaticity is  found in the Stroop Interference Effect. • Stroop found that the act of reading could  interfere with your ability to perform simple  perceptual distinctions like naming colors.
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    The Stroop Effect, part 1 As fast as you can,  read the names  of the colors
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    The Stroop Effect, part 2 As fast as you can,  (don’t read the  word) but read the  name of the color  of the word.
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    The Stroop Effect, part 2 As fast as you can,  (don’t read the  word) but read the  name of the color  of the word.
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    The Stroop Effect • For adults, reading has become such an automatized  process that it is very difficult to turn off.  Thus, it can  cause errors when what you’re reading conflicts with  what you’re trying to attend to.   • Automatic processes occur even when you try to over- ride them.  
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    1. Selectivity: only aware of a subset of stimuli-- selective attention. 2. Capacity Limitations: limited ability to handle different tasks or stimuli at once . 2 primary aspects of attention:
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    Attention as a Selector: Find the  Green Scarf
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    Attention as a Selector: Find the  Bald Man
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    Selection Based on Color is Easy
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    Selection Based on upright vs upside down is not easy
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    Selective Attention: Feature Detection and Integration • You can select based on simple features,  like color.  This “Feature Detection”  process can be done automatically.
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    Treisman’s Feature Integration Theory The following is a demonstration that: detecting features is relatively automatic, and that integrating multiple features together and identifying the object is more attention-demanding.
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    Slap your thigh when you see the blue line.
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