Lecture 12 Feb 15 2008 Chemical sedimentary rocks

Lecture 12 Feb 15 2008 Chemical sedimentary rocks - There...

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Some minerals react chemically to form new solid products. Feldspars are weathered to clays. Clays may stay in place and form soils or be eroded as clastic sediment. The dissolved products are bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ), cations like K + , Na + , Ca 2+ , and dissolved silica. Some minerals are resistant to weathering and remain unchanged. Quartz is common is common as a clastic sediment. There are solid and dissolved products of weathering.
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Abundance of various types of sedimentary rocks
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The white (limestone) beaches and turquoise water of the Caribbean attract many UVA students on Spring Break.
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Modern snail (gastropod) shells
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Limestone with fossilized snail shells thoroughly cemented by more calcite. This rock is approximately 40 million years old. Information about the history of life on Earth is sometimes preserved in limestone.
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Coquina is a poorly cemented limestone composed of broken, abraded shell fragments – a shell hash. It is present only in relatively recent deposits such as in Florida.
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shells of carbonate-secreting foraminifera. These protozoa have lived in the oceans since the appearance of hard- shelled marine organisms 543 million years ago. Diagenesis usually
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2008 for the course EVSC 280 taught by Professor Herman during the Spring '08 term at UVA.

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Lecture 12 Feb 15 2008 Chemical sedimentary rocks - There...

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